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Would you please tell me what "expectations of transfer" means in the following sentence:

"Looking at the rea-estate situation right after the war, a group of Chicago business saw that there was a huge population of young veterans, but little available housing suitable for young poeple with (1) children, (2) expectations of transfer, (3) a taste for good living, (4) not too much money."

Thank you.

Cadzao
Comments  
I presume that the veteran servicemen were still in the military, and could expect to be transferred to other areas by their commanders.
Does "young people" in "but little available..." refer to "young veterans?" If so, why is the definite article THE not used before "young people"?

Please explain to me.

Thank you.

Cadzao
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CadzaoDoes "young people" in "but little available..." refer to "young veterans?"

If so, why is the definite article THE not used before "young people"?

You have two sets/groups/classes:

- the young veterans

- the young people with with (1) children, (2) expectations of transfer, (3) a taste for good living, (4) not too much money.

The author compares them, and considers that they overlap quite well, i.e. they are pretty similar in terms of attributes.
Mister Micawber wrote:

"I presume that the veteran servicemen were still in the military, and could expect to be transferred to other areas by their commanders."

Veteran: somebody who has served in the armed force (Encartar Dictionary).

Why "were they still in the military"? As far as I know, a veteran has to be someone who has finished his military service; in other words, he is an ex-soldier, isn't he? So why does he have to "expect to be transferred to other areas by his commanders?"

Please do me a favor and explain the phrase "expectations of transfer" a little more.

Thank you so much in advance.

Cadzao
I have no more to explain-- I was simply giving you my interpretation of your isolated text. To my mind, you are a veteran of a war if you come back from it alive; you may then be discharged, or you may elect to remain in the military. Here is what several other dictionaries have to say-- 'Encartar' notwithstanding:

an experienced person who has been through many battles; someone who has given long service; a person who has served in the armed forces; a serviceman who has seen considerable active service (Example: "The veterans laughed at the new recruits")

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Thank you so much, Mister Micawber. That's very kind of you.

Best regards,

Cadzao