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Can we say, "I have an experience going to England" or should we say "I have an experience of going to England."
I know it's natural to say "I've been to England"...but let's just examine the grammar of the sentences above.
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No "an" with experience, and just "going."

A: We need someone who's a world traveler for this job. Somoene who isn't upset at the prospect of world travel. Do you have any experience regarding the trials and tribulations associated with traveling abroad?
B: Well, I have experience going to England. I go there a few times a year to visit my grandmother.

You're right that "Ive been to England" is more natural, but I tried to think of a scenario where your version would make sense.
Grammar GeekI have experience going to England. I go there a few times a year to visit my grandmother
Yep...this scenario sure put my sentence in context. Question, though. When do we use the countable experience?

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When it's more like a synonym for an incident or an occurrence -- an event of some sort.

I had an interesting experience at the grocery store the other day.
That was an experience to remember!

We're more likely to have an adjective with it -- a memorable experience, a scary experience, and wonderful experience -- than to use "an experience" without adornment.
How about

I wrote a book about my experiences.
The first chapter is devoted to my experiece (in/of/__) getting stuck in an elevator. Then, the second chapter dwelt on an experience (in/of/__) having sex with a stranger...
lagatawCan we say, "I have an experience going to England" or should we say "I have an experience of going to England."I know it's natural to say "I've been to England"...but let's just examine the grammar of the sentences above.
What immediately came to my mind was this:

I'm having an out-of-body experience.Emotion: smile

But I suppose you could have other sorts of experiences. With the countable form, it seems to me that you "are having", not "have", an experience. You "have" experiences. Consider also the verb to experience.

-- Karen claims she often has out-of-body experiences.
-- More like out-of-mind experiences if you ask me!

-- Lying here all cozy, I'm having the experience of floating in warm water.
-- Did you wet the bed again?

-- Doctor, I'm experiencing a great deal of pain in my chest lately.
-- We'll have to do some blood work and a battery of other tests.
-- Of course, but how soon do you think you can remove the knife?

CJ
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CalifJimLying here all cozy, I'm having the experience of floating in warm water.
How would it sound if I removed the 'of' there?
i.e.
I'm having the experience floating in warm water.
lagatawHow would it sound if I removed the 'of' there?
i.e.
I'm having the experience floating in warm water.
How would it sound? I can answer this one in one word.

Wrong.

Emotion: smile
CJ
Please enlighten me of the correctness of GG's "I have experience going to England" vis-a-vis "I am having the experience of floating in warm water". Is it just because the word experience is used in two different ways in the two sentences?

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