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Please help me explain the difference between these two sentences:

He's gone to the beach.

He's been to the beach.

I actually know the difference but I don't know how to put them into English words.
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Thank you for your comment on this, Mr. Wordy.
Mr. Wordy, do you think students whose English is not their first language can easily understand the way I have explained it?
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I am a confused about this sentence:

"The flat cleaned yesterday."

I thought it needed a past tense form verb 'to be' which is was. However, when I checked using Microsoft Word, it did not give any negative comment. In this sentence, it means flat is the subject and cleaned is verb, does that mean flat as noun did the cleaning, but where is the object of the sentence? What did flat clean yesterday?
Hi Mymonkeymai

Microsoft Word is by no means a reliable grammar checker. I can't even begin to tell you the number of times MS Word has "corrected" correct grammar, made suggestions that made things worse, or ignored obvious errors.

I would suggest that your sentence should be: "The flat was cleaned yesterday."

The verb "to clean" can be used both transitively and intransitively. The sentence above is a passive construction and thus a transitive usage of the verb "to clean". However, the agent is not mentioned in the sentence. In other words, you could reword thus:

Yesterday the flat was cleaned by someone. = Someone cleaned the flat yesterday.
Thanks for the explanation and suggestion, Yankee.

How about this sentence?

"Nobody could answer the question what was harder than usual."

Is this correct? If not, can you please correct and tell me why?

Because for me, it seems correct but I find it a bit awkward using 'what'. I would rather say "Nobody could answer the question which was harder than usual." Or same format but with a comma before 'which'.

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Can anyone please help me differentiate these two sentences?

My brother who lives in Italy is a teacher.

My brother, who lives in Italy, is a teacher.



I believe the first one is merely stating a fact that the speaker's brother who lives in Italy is a teacher. I cannot explain the second one, unfortunately.
Hi,

Can anyone please help me differentiate these two sentences?



My brother who lives in Italy is a teacher.

I have more than one brother. The one I am talking about lives in Italy.

In other words, the information 'who lives in Italy' is needed to identify the brother that I am talking about.



My brother, who lives in Italy, is a teacher.

I only have one brother, so the information 'who lives in Italy' is not needed to identify him. It's just some extra information that I happen to want to tell you about him.

Best wishes, Clive
mymonkeymaiPlease help me explain the difference between these two sentences:
He's gone to the beach.

He's been to the beach.
Either one is okay if you want to say that in the past he has been at the beach. He's gone to the beach would suggest right now, unless you add "in the past" or "before" or "every weekend" or some modifier. He's been to the beach means virtually the same, with modifiers having the same effect.l You couldn't use "He's been to the beach" if you mean right now though. It has to mean he has gone there in the past. Gone can mean now and been can't.

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Could anyone give the difference between

"one-on-one" and "one-to-one" ?

I will be interviewed by a teacher for a course I have applied. In my email, I asked if it will be a one-on-one interview or a panel interview. He replied to me, "It will be a one-to-one interview."

Thanking in advance the people who will be replying.
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