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Please help me explain the difference between these two sentences:

He's gone to the beach.

He's been to the beach.

I actually know the difference but I don't know how to put them into English words.
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He's gone to the beach. -- he left to go to the beach some time in the recent past and he's still there.

He's been to the beach. -- he's just returned from the beach or he's been to the beach on one or more occasions in the past. The relative likelihood of these two meanings depends on the place referred to. The second meaning is unlikely with "beach", but more likely with, say "He's been to Japan".
Thank you Mr. Wordy. I am actually filling up a pre-application form for a course and I find few of the questions quite hard to put into explanation. Would you be able to enlighten me?

How about this, can you comment on the meaning of the underlined word in both sentences?

1a) When I was a child I would walk to school each day with my friends.

1b) Would you like a drink?
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2a) He used to be my best friend.

2b) He used a knife to open the letter.
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Thank you Mr. Wordy. I am actually filling up a pre-application form for a course and I find few of the questions quite hard to put into explanation. Would you be able to enlighten me?

How about this, can you comment on the meaning of the underlined word in both sentences?

1a) When I was a child I would walk to school each day with my friends.

1b) Would you like a drink?



2a) He used to be my best friend.

2b) He used a knife to open the letter.



mymonkeymai
Sorry for repeated replies, I have pressed "post" three times.
How are these questions relevant to a pre-application form for a course? The reason I ask is because if it's an application form that asks you to demonstrate your knowledge of English, I'm not sure you should copy answers that someone else provides. It may give a misleading impression.

On the other hand, I may have completely misunderstood what you mean.
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I don't mean to copy your explanation verbatim, I just wanted some enlightment so I can broaden my answers which of course using my own words. It was my mistake to say pre-application, it is actually a pre-interview task and actually it is recommending applicants to use grammar sites.

It's fine if you choose not to explain anymore, I will understand. I chose to be honest, thus I mentioned it to you. But it will be very helpful to me if you would continue to do so. Or would you rather want me to explain how I understood it first then I can ask your opinion?
If they're happy that you get external help then that's fine. But it might be a better exercise if you try to explain it. Why not have a go and then people here can comment?
Yes, I agree with you that it is a better exercise for me. So here it is.

1a) When I was a child I would walk to school each day with my friends.

- The word would is used as a repetition in the past. The first part of the sentence used was as the speaker is talking about when he/she was a child.

1b) Would you like a drink?

- The word would is used as an offer or invitation. It is offering or inviting someone to have a drink.

Mr. Wordy, please comment on this.
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