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Can anyone explain the meaning of the followings sentences and grammar behind such sentences:-

(1). We had to have a permit to enter the park.

(2). He has to have been a good cricket player.

(3). It is understood to have done it beautifully.

Thanks for Reading my Posted message and with Regards as an anticipation for the Best Result.................

Keepsmiling
Comments  
(1). We had to have a permit to enter the park.

It was necessary for us to have a written document that authorized us to go into the park.
___

(2). He has to have been a good cricket player.

There is no other conclusion except that he was good at playing cricket.
___

(3). It is understood to have done it beautifully.

Ungrammatical. It makes no sense.

CJ
keepsmilingCan anyone explain the meaning of the followings sentences and grammar behind such sentences:-

(1). We had to have a permit to enter the park.

(2). He has to have been a good cricket player.

(3). It is understood to have done it beautifully.

Thanks for Reading my Posted message and with Regards as an anticipation for the Best Result..

Keepsmiling


The first sentence is OK but I'd say:

"We had to have a permission to enter the park"

The second sentence sounds a littel weird and it would be better if written like this:

"He must have been a good cricket player"

The third sentence makes no sense.
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Hi, Keepsmiling

I just wanted to remind you that you shall say: following. That extra "s" is inappropriate.

That's it!

Cheers!
rafaelinrio"We had to have a permission to enter the park"
Is that a typo?
Thanks for reminding me about that inappropriate.
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Thanks for helping me regarding the above problems

But for your information,
second Sentence is absolutely right according to English grammar.
That's right, pal. Nevertheless, a grammatically correct sentences may be right in structure but meaningless.
On the other hand, I feel ok with your second sentence, similar to this one:

She has to have been asleep when I knocked on her door. ~ She must have been asleep when I knocked on her door.

But, to be honest, I'd use the "must" sentence instead of the "has" one.

Your comments, please.

Cheers,
Sorry for my extra "S" on "sentenceS".

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