The question has recently entered my mind whether there is a distinction drawn between the word "exploit," and "exploitation," in terms of reference being made to an exploitable vulnerability found in a computer system. In general, I think the terms are interchangeable; but an "exploitation" might refer to something other than an "exploit," as the word "exploit" predicates the act of exploiting a weakness, as in, "To exploit a computer system is illegal," or, "I exploited my neighbor for $5." While the "exploitation" itself is the weakness. Any suggestions are appreciated.
thanks
The question has recently entered my mind whether there is a distinction drawn between the word "exploit," and "exploitation," in ... illegal," or, "I exploited my neighbor for $5." While the "exploitation" itself is the weakness. Any suggestions are appreciated.

Your sentence "I exploited my neighbor for $5." is not idiomatic English. Your neighbor may be the victim of exploitation, but it would not be expressed in this way.
You might say "I exploited my neighbor, who is house-bound, by frequently leaving my children in her care and not paying her as a baby-sitter". To "exploit" is to "take advantage of" in this context. It's not a word that takes a specific dollar figure as you have done.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
The question has recently entered my mind whether there is a distinction drawn between the word "exploit," and "exploitation,"

"Exploit" as a noun meaning an act of exploitation is computer jargon. "Exploitation" is normal English.
The jargon-word has only the negative meaning. The normal word also has the more positive meaning of productive use. Making good use of the onboard memory in the CPU is exploitation but not an exploit.

¬R
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The question has recently entered my mind whether there is a distinction drawn between the word "exploit," and "exploitation,"

"Exploit" as a noun meaning an act of exploitation is computer jargon.

Yes. Plus I believe in computer jargon it also means a weakness, for example a vulnerability to a virus, a meaning that grates on me, because it's bass-ackwards from any earlier meaning of exploit that I know. It's the virus or the virus writer which is engaging in an exploit, but instead they say the victim computer or computer program has an exploit.
"Exploitation" is normal English. The jargon-word has only the negative meaning. The normal word also has the more positive meaning of productive use.

Or of fun, daring, and excitement: Some of my exploits have been hitchhiking to Panama, riding my bicycle across the Verrazanno Bridge (in violation of their rules), and walking alone in the woods in the dark, falling into a ditch and sleeping all night in the ditch with a broken leg. In retrospect, even the last one was good, but probably not conisidered productive. The exploits of Indiana Jones are even more exciting than mine.
from dictionary.com: a striking or notable deed; feat; spirited or heroic act.
Making good use of the
onboard memory in the CPU is exploitation but not an exploit. ¬R

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
"Exploitation" is normal English. The jargon-word has only the negative meaning. The normal word also has the more positive meaning of productive use.

Or of fun, daring, and excitement: Some of my exploits

No, the normal word "exploitation." (The normal English noun "exploit" is, of course, exactly as you describe and has little to do with the homonymous jargon-word.)
¬R
Or of fun, daring, and excitement: Some of my exploits

No, the normal word "exploitation."

See below**.
Well, again, you don't say where you are, but in the US, Indiana Jones and I engage in exploits, not exploitation.
One can exploit the natural resources of a location, and one can exploit migrant workers who will work for very little money, and the second and probably the first are exploitation, but what I've done isn't.
(The normal English noun "exploit" is, of course, exactly as you describe and has little to do with the homonymous jargon-word.)

Are you sure it's not the same word used with a backwards meaning? Isn't my word the origin of the jargon-word, and doesn't that make them the same word? If not, what is the origin of the computer-jargon word.
**Wait a second. Now you're agreeing with me, but you started of, with "No" and three other words. I must not have understood those four words.
¬R

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
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I've lost track of who is agreeing or disagreeing with what or whom.

As previously said, there are two meanings of the computer jargon word "exploit". The first is "an instance of exploiting a vulnerability or hole". The second is "an exploitable vulnerability or hole".

The first matches the meaning of the verb "exploit" more closely than does the non-jargon word "exploit" which seems to have more to do with adventure than exploiting.
The second meaning is, to me, vomit provoking.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
I've lost track of who is agreeing or disagreeing with what or whom.

Nobody's disagreeing. I was just clarifying which word I meant by "the normal word."
The first matches the meaning of the verb "exploit"

Exactly. The jargon-word is formed from that verb, which has the same origin as the ordinary noun "exploit" but a completely different meaning. The verb is itself rather new imported from French a few decades after "exploitation" was, according to etymonline.com.
¬R Blather, Rinse, Repeat.
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