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In total, I have attended and been examined with success in 42 subjects some of which that I would like to highlight are ...


Is it correct?

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anonymous

In total, I have attended and been examined with success in 42 subjects some of which that I would like to highlight are ...


Is it correct?

I think you're trying to say too much all at once.

You've said that you've attended 42 subjects, but in English we don't say that we "attended a subject". You can attend a play or a concert, and you can attend a class in a subject, but you can't attend a subject.

"To be examined with success" suggests that the examiner has succeeded in examining you. I think you mean that you did well in your exams.

The part with "some of which" is ungrammatical. You should start a new clause.

In total I have attended classes and successfully passed exams in 42 subjects, and some (of them) that I would like to highlight are ...

CJ

Comments  
anonymousIn total, I have successfully passed the examinations in 42 subjects, and some of which that I would like to highlight are ...
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Hi CJ

I was thinking of the use of phrase "in total" here. Does the phrase mean, "On the whole" something similar to that effect?

vsureshI was thinking of the use of phrase "in total" here.

It's usually used with the specific mention of a number.

In total ... 42 ...

In other words

If you add them all up, ... 42 ...


We had 14 people for dinner last night and 6 tonight, so in total we had 20 people here for dinner in just two nights.

CJ

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Thank you, CJ.

Then, I have question. Can we consider placing the phrase here?

I have attended classes and successfully passed exams in total 42 subjects, and some (of them) that I would like to highlight are ...

vsureshCan we consider placing the phrase here?

No. In that case it's

I have attended classes ... in a total of 42 subjects, and ...

The usage above is similar to a partitive construction (a bottle of soda, a bucket of walnuts, a glass of water, ...).

The one with just 'in total' has to be purely adverbial, usually either at the beginning or the end of the clause.

CJ

CalifJimThe usage above is similar to a partitive construction (a bottle of soda, a bucket of walnuts, a glass of water, ...).

I understand it. Thank you very much, CJ.

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