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Hi

Would you say that these two expressions are common among native speakers? (Although I notice in my dictionaries that 'a brown study' is a dated expression, I recently came across it in our local newspaper.)

A brown study

Navel-Gazing

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/a-brown-study?topic=thinking-and-contemplating

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/navel-gazing

Thanks,

Tom

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Brown study - I've never heard of it. Must be British.

fraze.it comes up empty.

https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22brown+study%22&l=0


Naval-gazing, wool-gathering - I hear them, but not often.

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Mr. Toma brown study

I think I've read it a British publication once or twice, but that was some time ago. It seems I have to look up its meaning every time I run across it because it strikes me as somewhat foreign every time I see it.

Mr. TomNavel-Gazing

I haven't heard this expression in many, many years. I don't think it's used anymore. Not here anyway.

CJ

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Comments  
CalifJimI think I've read it a British publication once or twice,

Did you read any of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries? It was used there a time or two.

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AlpheccaStars
CalifJimI think I've read it a British publication once or twice,

Did you read any of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries? It was used there a time or two.

Ah! Now you mention it, that must have been where I ran across it.

Good detective work, Sherlock Stars! Emotion: smile

CJ

AlpheccaStarsBrown study - I've never heard of it. Must be British.

It might have been a long time ago. It's not been familiar in the UK in recent decades.

CalifJimNavel-GazingI haven't heard this expression in many, many years. I don't think it's used anymore. Not here anyway.CJ

It's been used a few times by British talk radio. It's not an everyday thing.

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