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1. Assume that someone was lying on the ground injured



Would any of these expressions be appropriate to be used?



a) "Hang in there. I'm going to call for help."


b) "Hold on. I'm going to call for help."



Note: I should emphasize that the person is lying on the ground, and is not hanging or holding anything.



2. Now, assume that I'm speaking to someone to get their help, would it be correct to say:



a) "Jim was still alert when I came, but he certainly won't hang in there the whole time."


b) "Jim was still alert when I came, but he certainly won't hold on there the whole time."



Note: Can those expressions be used, even if not in the imperative form.

Comments  
Christine Christie

Would any of these expressions be appropriate to be used

a) "Hang in there. I'm going to call for help." Yes.


b) "Hold on. I'm going to call for help." Yes.


Note: I should emphasize that the person is lying on the ground, and is not hanging or holding anything.

Hang in there / Hold on both have the connotation of being willfully persistent to stay conscientious in the context.

2. Now, assume that I'm speaking to someone to get their help, would it be correct to say:


a) "Jim was still alert when I came arrived, but he certainly wasn't coherent won't hang in there the whole time."


b) "Jim was still alert when I came arrived, but he certainly wasn't completely alert won't hold on there the whole time.

The sentences as written were bewildering at best. Won't - is present tense, the sentence was written in past. Corrected as edited.