There are a number of expressions in English with the word 'Dutch''. Some of them have a neutral meaning (e.g. Dutch doors} whereas other expressions heve a negative meaning, e.g.'Dutch courage' / 'to talk like a Dutch uncle'.
I wonder if anyone in the newsgroup could explain why there are quite a number of these negative expressions.
We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

Arthur
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There are a number of expressions in English with the word 'Dutch''. Some of them have a neutral meaning (e.g. ... explain why there are quite a number of these negative expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

Ah but you were allies of the Spanish at the time of the Armada. Another 500 years and we may have forgotten that ;-)

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There are a number of expressions in English with the word 'Dutch''. Some of them have a neutral meaning (e.g. ... explain why there are quite a number of these negative expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we.......?

You, the Dutch, are wonderful people, and I should know; I lived in Eindhoven for five years.
I believe that most of these phrases either date from the Anglo-Dutch wars and trade conflicts of the 17th century, or arose later but are mirrored on the earlier coinages.
It is not that the Dutch are singled out. We talk about French leave, kisses, letters,...Spanish fly, German measles, Scotch mist, etc. Originally some of these phrases were meant in a slightly derogatory sense probably because of colonial rivalry or xenophobia in times gone by.
Many, however, hint at something exotic or different, or risqué.

These days the negative meanings have largely been forgotten and they have just become everyday phrases. We are all far too politically correct to intend any real offence and any leg-pulling is meant entirely light-heartedly.
Anyway, I believe that many of our continental cousins use similarly slightly derogatory terms based around the English. After all, we were known as Perfidious Albion at one time.
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There are a number of expressions in English with the ... expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

Ah but you were allies of the Spanish at the time of the Armada. Another 500 years and we may have forgotten that ;-)

I think that will come as news to the Dutch :-)

John Briggs
There are a number of expressions in English with the word 'Dutch''. Some of them have a neutral meaning (e.g. ... explain why there are quite a number of these negative expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

"Dutch" once had a much broader meaning - as in Deutsch. (I believe this survives in the USA in "Pennsylvania Dutch".) Partridge gives "Dutchman" as nautical slang for a German or "any North European seaman except a Finn" into the C20th.
The nationalities that were most frequently in contact tended to become the butt of slang - perhaps especially if there'd been rivalry. Being isolated, Brits hadn't got as many neighbours to insult as mainland European countries. Partridge also has plenty of unflattering terms based on "Scotch", "Welsh", "Irish", "French" and "Spanish" - but almost nothing for, say, "Italian", "Swedish" or "Swiss". I expect "English" features in the old slang of England's neighbours.

"Dutch" expressions that survive don't seem to be used to refer to real Dutch people - they're just expressions.

Phil C.
There are a number of expressions in English with the word 'Dutch''. Some of them have a neutral meaning (e.g. ... explain why there are quite a number of these negative expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

In matters of commerce the fault of the Dutch
Is giving too little and asking too much;
With equal protection the French are content
So we'll lay on Dutch bottoms just twenty percent.
John Briggs
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There are a number of expressions in English with the ... expressions. We - the Dutch- are nice people, aren't we..?

Ah but you were allies of the Spanish at the time of the Armada. Another 500 years and we may have forgotten that ;-)

At the time of the Spanish Armada the Dutch were involved in a national rebellion against the Catholic Spanish monarchy. They recceived quite a lot of help from English Protestants. Indeed this was one of the many reasons for the Armada.
The hostility between the English and the Dutch dates from the next century when there was constant rivalry between the Dutch East India Company and the English East India Company for the East India trade. During the Commonealth period this even led to a war between the English and the Dutch (settled in 1654 IIRC).
this period didn't last very long and in 1688 teh English parliament even invited the Statthalter (a sort of aristocratic president) of Holland (I'm not certain of his exact title) to become King William III.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Ah but you were allies of the Spanish at the time of the Armada. Another 500 years and we may have forgotten that ;-)

At the time of the Spanish Armada the Dutch were involved in a national rebellion against the Catholic Spanish monarchy. ... Statthalter (a sort of aristocratic president) of Holland (I'm not certain of his exact title) to become King William III.

He was Prince of Orange :-)
Here's a trick question: William of Orange versus James II - who did the Pope support?

John Briggs
After all, we were known as Perfidious Albion at one time.

Still are mate, the French haven't yet seen any reason to change their mind on that one.
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