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For instance, the web was running extremely slow or extremely slowly? Thanks!
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[1] The web runs slow.
[2] The web runs slowly.

Both are correct and the same in meaning.
#1 is rather colloquial.

paco
AnonymousFor instance, the web was running extremely slow or extremely slowly? Thanks!
We can use an averb to modify an adjective,

Ex: The car was going extremely fast when the accident occured.

We also can use adverb mofifying another adverb which modifies an adjective.

Ex: The weather was extremely miserably hot for the last few days. This construct is used to dramatize an event or occurrance.

"Extremely slowly" is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it.
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Goodman
AnonymousFor instance, the web was running extremely slow or extremely slowly? Thanks!
We can use an averb to modify an adjective,

Ex: The car was going extremely fast when the accident occured.

We also can use adverb mofifying another adverb which modifies an adjective.

Ex: The weather was extremely miserably hot for the last few days. This construct is used to dramatize an event or occurrance.

"Extremely slowly" is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it.
You are right but you are wrong. You are right in that you said that adverbs can modify adjectives and other adverbs. You are wrong in that you do not understand that adverbs can also modify verbs. The "ad-verbs" is "to-verbs".

paco
Paco,

I have to give you my 2 cents for your groundless assumption. The question in discussion was the adjective phrase "extremely slow or extremely slowly". Just becasue I didn't include "verbs" as part of my explanation does not mean I didn't know how adverbs behave. I wonder what you were thinking when you wrote that comment "You are wrong in that you do not understand that adverbs can also modify verbs". I think you are dead wrong. In fact I know I understand English more than your perception can see. When you call somebody wrong next time, I suggest you'd better be 100 % right!
GoodmanPaco,

I have to give you my 2 cents for your groundless assumption. The question in discussion was the adjective phrase "extremely slow or extremely slowly". Just becasue I didn't include "verbs" as part of my explanation does not mean I didn't know how adverbs behave. I wonder what you were thinking when you wrote that comment "You are wrong in that you do not understand that adverbs can also modify verbs". I think you are dead wrong. In fact I know I understand English more than your perception can see. When you call somebody wrong next time, I suggest you'd better be 100 % right!I'm sorry if you feel as if you were offended. But if you know adverbs can modify verbs, why did you write such a thing as below?
Goodman"Extremely slowly" is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it.
I will say that "the web runs extremely slowly" is 100 % right!

paco

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Paco,

I am not as offended by your comment as I feel for your lack of, shall I say, humbleness. I am not going to criticize the correctness of your sentence which you boosted to be 100% correct. But in reference to my comment which you had publicly deprecated, you obviously don't understand English as well as I thought you do. read it again! I said "Extremely slowly" is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it". And you added context to it, didn't you? Why don't you just admit that you can't stand people who disagee with your opinions or views. You googled everything for the asnwer becasue you don't "confidently" have the answer. Googling is fine, I do it. But I don't plagiarize the google material as my own answers. I am sorry if I bursted your bubble but you won't know it from looking into the mirror.
Goodman
Paco,

I am not as offended by your comment as I feel for your lack of, shall I say, humbleness. I am not going to criticize the correctness of your sentence which you boosted to be 100% correct. But in reference to my comment which you had publicly deprecated, you obviously don't understand English as well as I thought you do. read it again! I said "Extremely slowly" is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it". And you added context to it, didn't you? Why don't you just admit that you can't stand people who disagee with your opinions or views. You googled everything for the asnwer becasue you don't "confidently" have the answer. Googling is fine, I do it. But I don't plagiarize the google material as my own answers. I am sorry if I bursted your bubble but you won't know it from looking into the mirror.

Goodnan

Please make sure for me what you meant by saying "'Extremely slowly' is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it". Did you use the phrase "unless there is additional context to connect with it" to mean "when 'extremely slowly" stands alone with nothing"? If it is the case, I can agree with you someway. It is possible we utter "extremely slowly" alone in a dialogue, but "extremely slowly" alone cannot stands as a sentence. This is also true about any words, however. In English, a meaningful sentence should take a form either like "what is what" or "what does what". But I think everybody here knows this kind of basic thing.

Anyway, I am glad if you kindly make me sure whether "The web runs extremely slowly" is a correct sentence or not. It is because you put "'Extremely slowly' is incorrect unless there is additional context to connect with it" immediately after my posting and I took it as if you said that "The web runs extremely slowly" is a wrong sentence. If you say you had no intention to say "The web runs extremely slowly" is wrong, we can finish this arguement.

I have never had such a feeling that I cannot stand with opinions disagreeable to mine. To the contrary, I am quite ready to accept any opinion that is reasonable to me even if it is new to me. It is because I believe I am, unlike you, a mere learner of English still at a beginner's level. It is true I am posting questions to others when I cannot understand their opinion or when they say anything new to me, but is it wrong? I believe forums of this kind are provided for such a purpose.

Yes, you are someway right that I am googling about what I suspect as much as possible. But what is wrong with it? Is it wrong that an ESL student like me tries to expand English knowledge with help of web information? And is it wrong to write here what I come to know online?

paco
I'm always learning something new here.

I went to Merriam-Webster's online site, which often has usage notes that I find quite useful. http://www.m-w.com /

Main Entry: 2slow
Function: adverb
: SLOWLY
usage Some commentators claim that careful writers avoid the adverb slow, in spite of the fact that it has had over four centuries of usage <have a continent forbearance till the speed of his rage goes slower -- Shakespeare>. In actual practice, slow and slowly are not used in quite the same way.

Slow is almost always used with verbs that denote movement or action, and it regularly follows the verb it modifies <beans... are best cooked long and slow -- Louise Prothro>.

Slowly is used before the verb <a sense of outrage, which slowly changed to shame -- Paul Horgan> and with participial adjectives <a slowly dawning awareness... of the problem -- Amer. Labor>.

Slowly is used after verbs where slow might also be used <burn slow or slowly> and after verbs where slow would be unidiomatic <the leadership turned slowly toward bombing as a means of striking back -- David Halberstam>.
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