(posted and mailed)
(Followups redirected to alt.usage.english)
I say this because good basic reading skills at least enable me to recognize that a word "looks wrong" and to recognize that "fictional" and "admittance" are fake words though highly educated folks use them.

)
I might have a bright, shiny hook in my cheek, but I found both of these words in a simple search at www.dictionary.com.

Since when have they been "fake words"? And according to whom?
)
Hey, I'll be 49 in mid-January. I recall when ain't wasn't in the dictionary. Admission and fictitious were pounded into my head in Catholic school, so admittance and fictional have not been part of my life. Just as the word normality is preferred over normalcy.(snippage)

(Now I'm writing:)
Gina, in other threads (on alt.tv.er) you talk about your current medical problems, for which you have my sympathy.

But I somehow can't let a cavalier "fake words" put-down pass without comment, especially with the off-hand "though educated people use them" slam. I perceive that the underlying message is a supercilious "Well, I know they're 'fake words' and anyone who uses them is displaying ignorance."
Languages change, and what was considered non-standard in the 1960's (by teachers who were educated a generation earlier) doesn't mean that new words or meanings don't develop over time in the rest of the English-speaking world.
Now, to address the your assertions about "fake words":
Admission vs. Addmittance

=
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=admission

Usage Note: It is often maintained that admittance should be used only to refer to achieving physical access to a place (He was denied admittance to the courtroom), and that admission should be used for the wider sense of achieving entry to a group or institution (her admission to the club; China's admission to the United Nations). There is no harm in observing this distinction, though it is often ignored. But admission is much more common in the sense “a fee paid for the right of entry”: The admission to the movie was five dollars.
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=admittance
Usage: Admittance, Admission. These words are, to some extent, in a state of transition and change. Admittance is now chiefly confined to its primary sense of access into some locality or building. Thus we see on the doors of factories, shops, etc. No "admittance." Its secondary or moral sense, as "admittance to the church," is almost entirely laid aside. Admission has taken to itself the secondary or figurative senses; as, admission to the rights of citizenship; admission to the church; the admissions made by one of the parties in a dispute.

And even when used in its primary sense, it is not identical with admittance. Thus, we speak of admission into a country, territory, and other larger localities, etc., where admittance could not be used. So, when we speak of admission to a concert or other public assembly, the meaning is not perhaps exactly that of admittance, viz., access within the walls of the building, but rather a reception into the audience, or access to the performances. But the lines of distinction on this subject are one definitely drawn.
Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.
Fictional vs. Fictitious

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=fictional

adj 1: related to or involving literary fiction; "clever fictional devices"; "a fictional treatment of the train robbery" (ant: nonfictional) 2: formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"; "used fictitious names"; "a made-up story" (syn: fabricated, fancied, fictitious, invented, made-up)
Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=fictitious

adj 1: formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"; "used fictitious names"; "a made-up story" (syn: fabricated, fancied, fictional, invented, made-up) 2: adopted in order to deceive; "an assumed name"; "an assumed cheerfulness"; "a fictitious address"; "fictive sympathy"; "a pretended interest"; "a put-on childish voice"; "sham modesty" (syn: assumed, false, fictive, pretended, put on, sham)
Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

And, even though this wasn't part of the original discussion, but since you threw it in to your "but that's they way I was taught" defense:
Normality vs. Normalcy

==


normality
n : conformity with the norm (syn: normalcy) (ant: abnormality)

Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

normalcy
n : conformity with the norm (syn: normality) (ant: abnormality)

Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University
I'm fairly sure others will join the thread to correct or contradict me.

Jeffrey "Flopping in the bottom of the boat" Zahn
1 2
I'm fairly sure others will join the thread to correct or contradict me.

Why, other than the fictitious "law" MC named after himself?

Martin Ambuhl
I say this because good basic reading skills at least ... "admittance" are fake words though highly educated folks use them.

Chambers (1910) lists both "fictional" and "fictitious" under "fiction", and lists "admission" and "admittance" together, with a single definition.
Hey, I'll be 49 in mid-January. I recall when ain't ... life. Just as the word normality is preferred over normalcy.

(snippage)

Aha. "SISO" psychological patterning. You had to do something you didn't like and you don't see why anyone else should get away with not doing it.
Normality vs. Normalcy

== http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=normality normality n : conformity with the norm (syn: normalcy) (ant: abnormality) Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University normalcy n : conformity with the norm (syn: normality) (ant: abnormality) Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

"Normalcy" is not listed in the 1910 dictionary, and the 1993 edition labels it "esp US"; I don't consider it to be British English.

Adrian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
normalcy n : conformity with the norm (syn: normality) (ant: abnormality) Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

"Normalcy" is not listed in the 1910 dictionary, and the 1993 edition labels it "esp US"; I don't consider it to be British English.

I'm sure I remember Alistair Cooke saying that "normalcy" started as a Bushesque slip by a US President.
Mike.
"Normalcy" is not listed in the 1910 dictionary, and the 1993 edition labels it "esp US"; I don't consider it to be British English.

I'm sure I remember Alistair Cooke saying that "normalcy" started as a Bushesque slip by a US President.

It wasn't a slip - it was a campaign slogan in the 1920 election. You can hear Harding say it at
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/nfhtml/nfexpe.html .

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
It wasn't a slip - it was a campaign slogan in the 1920 election. You can hear Harding say it at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/nfhtml/nfexpe.html .

The Century Dictionary ( www.century-dictionary.com ), an American dictionary of 1895, has an entry for "normalcy":
(quote)
normalcy n. (In geom., the state or fact of being normal.
(Rare.)
The co-ordinates of the point of contact, and normalcy. Davies and Peck, Math. Dict. ( Encyc. Dict. )
(end quote)
It's also in the 1913 Webster's unabridged dictionary.

From
http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=normalcy
(quote)
Normalcy (Page: 982)
Nor"*** (?), n. The quality, state, or fact of being normal; as, the point of normalcy. (R.)
(end quote)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Don Aitken filted:
I'm sure I remember Alistair Cooke saying that "normalcy" started as a Bushesque slip by a US President.

It wasn't a slip - it was a campaign slogan in the 1920 election. You can hear Harding say it at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/nfhtml/nfexpe.html .

Amazing...Mike's recollection immediately made me think of Harding, though I'd never heard of the slogan before just now...and then you come along and confirm it, with documentation and all..
The one trait I associate with ol' Warren G is a perverse knack for saying things no human being could understand..r
labels

It wasn't a slip - it was a campaign slogan in the 1920 election. You can hear Harding say it at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/nfhtml/nfexpe.html .

The Century Dictionary ( www.century-dictionary.com ), an American dictionary of 1895, has an entry for "normalcy": (quote) normalcy ... 982) Nor"*** (?), n. The quality, state, or fact of being normal; as, the point of normalcy. (R.) (end quote)

Thanks. I see that OED1 dates the mathematicalcy of the form at 1857, and will henceforward doubt Cooke's practicalcy as a source.

Mike.
(posted and mailed) (Followups redirected to alt.usage.english)

(posted and mailed)
I say this because good basic reading skills at least ... "admittance" are fake words though highly educated folks use them.

Hey, I'll be 49 in mid-January. I recall when ain't ... life. Just as the word normality is preferred over normalcy.

adj 1: formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"; ... WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University I'm fairly sure others will join the thread to correct or contradict me.

When reading the definitions and usage notes for "Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.," it should be kept in mind that this is essentially the 1913 Webster's revised and unabridged. That is, revised in 1913, not recently.
See
http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Admittance

for the same entry as presented by the ARTFL Project(1).

Someone has done some annotation on the ARTFL version of this dictionary. The material between the angled brackets in the entry for "yaourt," for example, has been added.
http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=yaourt

"Yaourt (Page: 1672)
"Yaourt (?), n. (Turk. yoghurt.) A fermented drink, or milk beer, made by the Turks."
The MICRA version has no such note.
Gina, the poster to whom you were replying, wrote that "I recall when ain't wasn't in the dictionary." This just shows that she didn't have a very good dictionary. "Ain't" was in Webster's Second ( Webster's New International Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd. ed.) It's in the Century Dictionary ( www.century-dictionary.com ), an American dictionary of 1895, pronounced as now (rhymes with "paint"), but spelled both "ain't" and "an't." And it is in Noah Webster's 1828 dictionary, where it is spelled "ant."
See
http://65.66.134.201/cgi-bin/webster/webster.exe?firstp=8406

The pronunciation that Webster gave it was the same as "ain't" is pronounced today. I know this because I have seen a facsimile edition of Webster's 1828 dictionary with pronunciations.
I see no justification whatsoever for calling "ain't" a "fake word," or "fictional," "admittance," or "normalcy." "Ain't" is nonstandard, although used jocularly by educated people (as when Ronald Reagan said "You ain't seen nothing yet!") but that makes it no less a word. The others are entirely standard.
Note:
(1) I finally decided to find out what, exactly, is the ARTFL Project.

From
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/orgs/ARTFL /
"The Project for American and French Research on the Treasury of the French Language (ARTFL) is a cooperative enterprise of Analyse et Traitement Informatique de la Langue Française (ATILF) of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the Division of the Humanities, the Division of the Social Sciences, and Electronic Text Services (ETS) of the University of Chicago."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
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