+0
Does "Far off by furthest roses, we foot it all the night" mean "far off from the earthly world, we walk by the roses that are in the furthest place...we walk all the night"?

Context:

Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim gray sands with light,
Far off by furthest roses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And anxious in its sleep.
Comments  
NL888"far off from the earthly world,
There is nothing in the poem that says it is not on the earth.

It is a place by the farthest roses. We walk all night.
Thanks.
But I failed to understand "farthest roses" - does it refer to "remote roses"?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I envisage wild roses that are a great distance from human habitation.
By the way, I think that "foot it" means "dance".
AlpheccaStarsI envisage wild roses that are a great distance from human habitation.
I can't see any other meaning, but I find it a bit odd since other references seem to be to a seaside scene, which doesn't seem a typical habitat for roses.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
GPYI can't see any other meaning, but I find it a bit odd since other references seem to be to a seaside scene, which doesn't seem a typical habitat for roses.
It falls in the "romantic" category of all the poetic licenses.

I was pondering over the meaning "Far off by furthest Rosses" too.

I think the meaning is not "rose" - as a flower but "The Rosses" as a geographical and social region in the west of County Donegal, Ireland.