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Let's say you would like to get feedback from your clients but you clients are not familiar with your product, therefore, can't provide any. What you do is create a prototype for them to play with and hopefully that will help them form opinions about the product. How do i put that in a sentence?

We created a prototype to ____ (attract/solicit) feedback ?

Thanks.
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I guess I'm avoiding your question, but IMO "prototype" is not the word. Perhaps, "model." Maybe not.

When you say the client is not familiar with your product, that implies that the product has reached some level of perfection. A prototype is understood to be an original, at least by me. When you build a new prototype, you're creating a new design. (Maybe I'm wrong.)

I suppose you could say that the Model T Ford was prototypical, in a certain sense.

- A.
AvangiWhen you build a new prototype, you're creating a new design. (Maybe I'm wrong.)
Yes. it's new.
AvangiWhen you say the client is not familiar with your product, that implies that the product has reached some level of perfection
Strictly speaking, I agree with you. It's possible that loosely speaking, the client has not seen the product? If not, what would be a good way of saying it? New to the clients?
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New2grammarWe created a prototype to ____ (attract/solicit) feedback ?
To me, this is too condensed to be practical, unless considerable correspondence has already occurred. (And I still object to "create a prototype." If you create a prototype for a client, he will be the first client to ever see your product. A prototype typically precedes R & D. I've been involved with things like this where a good customer was sent a prototype for comment. My problem is, your question was framed in such a way as to imply that your product was already in full production, but unknown to this particular client.)

"We are shipping you a working model of our new product at no expense to you, and we encourage you to put it through its paces. Please inform us of any problems or suggestions you may have."

In a followup letter, you might say, "Do you have any feedback on the product we shipped to you?"

The circumstances are too complex to try to fit into one sentence.

- A..
I thought I could get by without providing the full context. I'm updating my resume and as far as I know, it has to be concise in point form. Yes, you are right about the RnD. We did spend a number of years developing the product. We also created a prototype of the product to get feedback from potential customers. I want to highlight that point since I was involved in the prototyping.

I hope that it's clear now. I'm sorry for all the confusion.
Just between you and me, I think confusion is very useful in this sort of work.

Now knowing the full story, I still think "prototype" is the wrong word. I've never heard it used in that way. I wonder what GG would say, as a graduate of a major engineering university?? (Dang, she's on vacation.)

- A.

Edit. Did you give this "working model" to potential customers before or after the product was in production?????

Writing a concise (condensed) version of a complex tale requires considerable skill. I wish you good luck. Is it better to leave the reader bored or confused?
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AvangiWriting a concise (condensed) version of a complex tale requires considerable skill.
I can't agree more.

Just to give you an idea of what I meant by concise (I made an inconsiderate assumption. I assumed everyone knows engineering to a certain level, therefore, the format of enginering resume is common)

http://www.resume-resource.com/extec1.html