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Dear Teachers,

1. - We want the citizens every time they drive in/on the streets having to wear a helmet like other countries, so at first we should consider again whether our infrastructure is like their infrastructure or not. All the streets in HCM City are pretty narrow, so many motorbikes and cars, slow speed, the traffic jam happens all the time are the reasons making wearing the helmet impossible.

- Protecting people lives is very necessary, but for me: wearing a helmet in the city should stops by just campaigning/agitating/mobilize people voluntary sense; we shouldn’t force/oblige people to do it.

- Are these sentences ok?

2. - Can you do weight-lifting/weightlift?

- Is this ok?

3.– Can you wash the dishes?
-Can you wash up?
-Can you do the washing-up?

- Are the sentences the same meaning?

4. - I don’t feel like playing Billiards today.
- I don’t feel like to cook the dinner.

- Are these natural?

Thanks very much to Teachers.
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Hi,

I made some corrections.

1. - We want all citizens to have to wear a helmet, as in other countries, every time they drive in the streets , so first we should reconsider whether or not our infrastructure is like theirs. The reason which makes wearing a helmet impossible is that all the streets in HCM City are pretty narrow, forcing many motorbikes and cars to travel at slow speed and causing traffic jams all the time.
- Protecting lives is very necessary but, for me, wearing a helmet in the city should be voluntary, and achieved just by mobilizing people's voluntary sense; we shouldn’t force people to do it.

2. - Can you do weight-lifting/weightlift?

- Is this ok? Say Can you do weight-lifting? or Can you lift weights?

3.– Can you wash the dishes?
-Can you wash up?
-Can you do the washing-up?

- Are the sentences the same meaning? Yes

4. - I don’t feel like playing billiards today.OK
- I don’t feel like to cook the dinner.No. Say
I don’t feel like cooking the dinner

Best wishes, Clive
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"to feel like" (and "not feel like") always takes the gerund form, never the infinitive.
I feel like cooking. I don't feel like cooking.
"to like" can take either the gerund or the infinitive.
I (don't) like cooking. I (don't) like to cook.
That may be the source of confusion.
CJ
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Hi, apart from the grammar, can I ask how you actually use the expression, 'feel like'?

Suppose I want to play football instead of basketball and my friends are asking me if I want to play basketball with them, can I say

=> No, I feel like playing football instead.

Suppose I want to make a fried chicken, can I say.

=> Well, I feel like making a fried chicken.

Suppose I want to eat Japanese sushi, can I say.

=> I feel like eating Japanese sushi.

Have I understood the 'feel like' correctly here?

Thanks in advance.
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You've got the idea, vc!

feel like = be in the mood for

Do you feel like going out to eat tonight?
I don't feel like having dinner. I'm not hungry.
I feel like playing [basketball / checkers / cards].

-- Want to go to a movie?
-- No. I don't feel like it. [I'm not in the mood.]

CJ