Hi teachers,

1. Would "their classmates" be same "their fellow students"?

2. 'John married his fellow student.' To me this sentence sounds like John was the teacher and he married one of his students.

3. Is 'fellow classmates" same as 'classmates of same equvalence'?

Thank you.

Tinanam
1. yes

2. This would most likely mean that John and his spouse were classmates.

3. Usually, yes.

"Fellow," in this context, is used to refer to one's peers.

If you are my fellow employee, then you and I are both employees at the same company. Not necessarily of the same rank, but you are not my boss nor am I yours, and we are at approximately the same level of the company. An executive and a mailroom clerk would not usually refer to one another as "fellow employee."

If you are my fellow passenger, then we are both passengers on the same train, bus, plane, etc.

I hope this helps.

-S
Hi,

1. Would "their classmates" be same "their fellow students"? Yes, if you are talking about people in the same class. But 'fellow students' could also refer eg to all the other students in your school.

2. 'John married his fellow student.' To me this sentence sounds like John was the teacher and he married one of his students. I think your difficulty is with the verb 'married', and not with the term 'fellow student'.

eg Does 'John Married Mary' mean that John became the husband, or that John conducted Mary's marriage ceremony?

3. Is 'fellow classmates" same as 'classmates of same equvalence'? The latter phrase sounds unnatural and even foolish. I don't even know what it means exactly.

Do you think you need the word 'fellow'? In most cases, it would be implicit in the word 'classmates'.

Finaly, let me add this. The word 'classmates' is widely used by English learners. However, in my experience, it is not widely used by native speakers, who more often say eg the other people in my class.

Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
tinanam01023. Is 'fellow classmates" same as 'classmates of same equivalence'?
Your wording is awkward. You probably mean "equal standing" or "equal rank" but I don't really know when you would ever say such a thing unless you are comparing academic records.
Hi Clive, hi MalRey, hi Bolton,

Thanks for your help.

Tinanam