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From the neighbouring school

Come the boys,

With more than their wonted noise

And commotion;

And down the wet streets

Sail their mimic fleets,

Till the treacherous pool

Engulfs them in its whirling

And turbulent ocean

Please tell me what figure of speech is used in the highlighted lines ?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
CalifJimThe use of 'treacherous' seems as simple as ordinary exaggeration to me, so I'd call this hyperbole.
And since I lost when it was revealed as a real puddle, I'm with CJ—if the pool is not really treacherous (unstable or insecure, as footing;dangerous; hazardous: a treacherous climb) but just a puddle where the kids enjoy playing.
Jhumjhum... because normally the word treacherous is used for a person ...
Not necessarily, especially when applied to an inanimate. Since the noun here is 'pool', which isn't a person, it wasn't the meaning 'traitorous' that came to mind, but 'marked by hidden dangers, hazards, or perils' (Merriam-Webster).

It seems to me that the boys' imaginations have just gone wild, as happens in this kind of play, and a harmless puddle is exaggerated into a frightening hazard for their "ships", which are also an exaggeration. To me, exaggeration is hyperbole.

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

And down the wet streets

Sail their mimic fleets,

Please explain the meaning

anonymousAnd down the wet streets Sail their mimic fleets, Please explain the meaning

The children sail their toy boats down the streets when it is raining and the gutters are running with rainwater.