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Hi, I am a bit confused with literary terms and figures of speech. What is the difference between those two?

I always thought they were the same but apparently to my teacher, there's a distinct difference that he didn't really care to elaborate on.

And.. would a paradox be considered a figure of speech or literary term?
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Mister MicawberFigures of speech are a kind of literary device. From online:

Figure of speech: 'A mode of expression in which words are used out of their literal meaning or out of their ordinary use; for instance, hyperbole, simile, metaphor.'

Literary device: 'a literary or linguistic technique that produces a specific effect, esp. a figure of speech, narrative style, or plot mechanism.'

I would call paradox a literary device. (Though I suppose it could include figures of speech... but don't ask me for an example.)

About 100 years ago when I was studying such things, 'paradox' was at the top of the list of literary devices that I had to memorize, including: personification, metaphor, motifs, irony, alliteration, hyperbole, imagery and symbolism.
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Philip, come on!I know you are at the same age with me!:D:D
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Figures of speech are a kind of literary device. From online:

Figure of speech: 'A mode of expression in which words are used out of their literal meaning or out of their ordinary use; for instance, hyperbole, simile, metaphor.'

Literary device: 'a literary or linguistic technique that produces a specific effect, esp. a figure of speech, narrative style, or plot mechanism.'

I would call paradox a literary device. (Though I suppose it could include figures of speech... but don't ask me for an example.)
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please give one example also!!!!!