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Hi,

What articles would you use in the sentence below?

Fill in an/the application for a/the registration of a/the new company, please.

The last one should be indefinite I think, because this is just a new company. We don't know more about it. But for application and registration I am not sure. On the one hand the procedure might be not known to the receiver, but on the other hand there is just one application paper and one registration process. Can someone help and explain?

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Can you please supply a little context. Who is saying this?

eg Is it your boss, after she has told you all about the new company?

eg Is it the person who works in the office where new companies are registered?



Please note also that when we complete a form, we usually say fill out this form.

But when we are talking about a specific detail on the form, we say eg Please fill in your date of birth.

Clbve

Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
ClivePlease note also that when we complete a form, we usually say fill out this form.But when we are talking about a specific detail on the form, we say eg Please fill in your date of birth.

OK, thanks for this information. If I make a mistake or can write something better, I am always grateful for feedback Emotion: smile

Cliveeg Is it the person who works in the office where new companies are registered?

Yes, this is exactly the intended context.

Cliveeg Is it your boss, after she has told you all about the new company?

I didn't think about this, but now you made me intrigued. Would the articles for application and registration differ in this context? I assume the ending would be obviously 'the new company' instead of 'a new company' here.

See if this helps.

________________________________________________________________________________

BOSS: Now that you know all about the new company, I'd like you to register it.

YOU: OK,I'll go and fill out a registration form this afternoon.

__________________________________________________________


YOU, at your colleague Tom's desk: Hey, Tom, the boss is starting a new company. He wants me to register it. Do you know how to do that?

TOM: Sure.You just fill out an application to register the new company. The form is called 'Registration of a Company'.

_______________________________________________________________________

YOU: Good morning. I'd like to register a new company, please.

CLERK in the government registration office: Please fill out this form.

_________________________________________________________________________

Yes, it helps Emotion: smile
And you didn't refer specifically to the original sentence, so either you didn't find it natural and suggested to abandon it altogether, or you wanted me to figure it out on my own now. Let me try:

1) First context - boss after a thorough description of a new company
Fill out an application for a registration of the new company, please.
an application
- first mention, not familiar to the receiver, so the indefinite article
a registration
- like above, however, I am now considering zero article as the best choice (treating registration as uncountable here)
the company
- second or nth mention

2) Second context - clerk giving advice
Fill out an application for a registration of a new company, please.
Here everything is new to the receiver, so this sentence is not overly helpful given his situation. And as you indicated, better to point out to a given paper or hand it over, and say 'fill out this application'.

Could you please confirm if I am correct or wrong?

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And you didn't refer specifically to the original sentence, so either you didn't find it natural and suggested to abandon it altogether, or you wanted me to figure it out on my own now. I simply didn't know the context. Let me try:

1) First context - boss after a thorough description of a new company
Fill out an application for a registration of the new company, please.
an application
- first mention, not familiar to the receiver, so the indefinite article
a registration
- like above, however, I am now considering zero article as the best choice (treating registration as uncountable here) Yes, zero article. <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
the company
- second or nth mention

2) Second context - clerk giving advice
Fill out an application for a registration of a new company, please.
Here everything is new to the receiver, so this sentence is not overly helpful given his situation. And as you indicated, better to point out to a given paper or hand it over, and say 'fill out this application'.

Could you please confirm if I am correct or wrong? Yes, I think you are OK with this. <<<<<<<

Clive

Thank you Emotion: smile