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Dear teachers,

Would you please tell me which of my choices you would rule out?

It took John only 1 a) a few / b) SOME (?) minutes [we cannot say c) ONLY FEW minutes, can we?] to wash and shave, and as he doesn’t usually have 2 a) much / b) any time for breakfast, he was ready to go in less than half an hour. He ran to the station and found very 3 few passengers waiting for the early morning train. He fortunately had 4 a) SOME / b) a little / c) ENOUGH [does it make sense ?] time to wait. When the train came, he was 5 a) little (?) / b) A LITTLE / c) VERY / RATHER / QUITE (?) surprised to notice that his compartment was empty. He had had difficulty in rising at such an early hour and he only got used to it 6 a) a few / b) SOME / c) MANY weeks later and he came to realize that the earlier he rose, the more relaxing his day would be.

Are there other possibilities I didn't think of ?

Thank you very much indeed.
Best regards,
Hela

PS: I don't know why all the tips you gave me to use bold face, etc., do not work. I'm so sad about it! Emotion: crying
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Comments  
Methinks, Hela that the reason no one has tackled this is that it is too jumbled up. Why don't you repost it and put one question on one line. Also, it may be best to wait for a reply instead of suggesting one. Then you can ask your "but what about" in a followup.
I just checked your posting format, but I don't see any 'bold' codes, Hela. To embolden a word or phrase, you must place it between a square-bracketed 'b' and a square-bracketed '/b'.

I agree with JTT that without some sort of similar treatment, it can be rather difficult to read. As for your paragraph, I have left the correct possibilities:

It took John only a few minutes to wash and shave, and as he doesn’t usually have much/any time for breakfast, he was ready to go in less than half an hour. He ran to the station and found very few passengers waiting for the early morning train. He fortunately had some/a little time to wait. When the train came, he was a little/very/rather/quite/somewhat surprised to notice that his compartment was empty. He had had difficulty in rising at such an early hour and he only got used to it a few/some/many weeks later; and he came to realize that the earlier he rose, the more relaxing his day would be.
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From a descriptive approach:

It took John only a few minutes to wash and shave, and since he doesn’t usually have any time for breakfast, he was ready to go in less than half an hour. He ran to the station and found very few passengers waiting for the early morning train. Fortunately, he had a little time to wait. When the train came, he was a little or very or rather or quite surprised to notice that his compartment was empty. He had had difficulty rising at such an early hour [in the past], and had only got(ten) used to it a few weeks later. He realized the earlier he rose, the more relaxing his day would be.

As for HTML coding, try this,

<b>word hereb> (bold)
<u>word hereu> (underlined)
<i>word herei> (italics)

All the best,
Neat way of demonstrating the HTML, Casi-- I'm going to go and see how you did that.
Thanks, MM. You're so sweet.

Here's how I did it: I put the b, the u, and the i in bold.
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Hello everyone,

I'm back earlier than expected. Thank you for your answers . Can I use little in blank # 4 ?

See you,
Hela

Because the sentence says 'fortunately', 'little' seems strange, semantically. We expect more time to be better and less time to be worse.
Dear teachers,

Can I also use "enough" for blank #2 ?

Thanks a lot,
Hela
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