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1)Let's buy a new sari with the annual bonus,can we?

a)can't we
b)don't we
c)shall we
d)no improvement

Ans:-A(written in my book)

Isn't (C) the correct answer?

2)They probably ___________ up the truck by now.

a)will catch
b)shall have caught
c)must have caught
d)would have caught

Ans:-D

Could anyone please tell me how (D) in this sentence is different from the rest?

3)One of their freighters,the Neptune ,_____ in two weeks.

a)will leave
b)would leave
c)will be leaving
d)would have left

Ans:-c

I have heard that we use “will be” + ing to talk about future events which are already fixed or decided.

Is it already decided in the above sentence?

Please advise,Thanks!
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Comments  (Page 2) 
AlpheccaStarsI don't use a tag question after "let's". There is no helping verb to tag on to.The question is rather irrelevant.
But you can use "shall we", right? So the right answer here should be (C), not (A).
MrGuedesBut you can use "shall we", right? So the right answer here should be (C), not (A).
Let's buy a new car with our bonus money.

Follow up questions:
What do you think?
Don't you agree?
(Why) shouldn't we? (This is perhaps the closest to a tag in structure, but asks a different question than a tag does.)
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BarbaraPAIs #2 missing the word "with" in your book as well?Caught up WITH the truck?
The Brits put it differently. They say things like, "I'll catch you up later" for "I'll catch up with you later."
AlpheccaStarsFollow up questions:What do you think?Don't you agree?(Why) shouldn't we? (This is perhaps the closest to a tag in structure, but asks a different question than a tag does.)
But I'm not referring to "follow up questions", but to "tag questions". In this case, I learnt the correct one would be "shall we?". Am I right about this?
MrGuedesBut I'm not referring to "follow up questions", but to "tag questions". In this case, I learnt the correct one would be "shall we?". Am I right about this?
In American English, a native speaker would not add a tag question. By that, I mean the formulaic rule for a tag question. It uses the helping verb from the main sentence, and negates it. It is asking a confirmation of the statement in the main sentence. (Asking "Are you sure?")
eg.
We will go tomorrow, won't we?
He must leave, mustn't he?
You are kidding, aren't you?

There is no helping verb that can be naturally taken from this sentence, so you can't apply the formula of a tag question.
Let's go tomorrow, letn't we? XXX

I suppose it makes sense to follow it with an equivalent restatement of the sentence as a question. In this case, there is no negation.

Let's go tomorrow = Shall we go tomorrow?

Let's go tomorrow, shall we (go tomorrow)?
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AlpheccaStarsIn American English, a native speaker would not add a tag question.
Oh, yes, I forgot most Americans don't like to use "shall" in daily conversations. But that's not so uncommon amongst British speakers.
AlpheccaStarsI suppose it makes sense to follow it with an equivalent restatement of the sentence as a question. In this case, there is no negation.
That's what is done when one adds "shall we?". There's no negative of let, so the general rule is, indubitably, unapplyable. "Shall we?" is thus an option.
MrGuedesThere's no negative of let,
Let's not go there, OK? Emotion: wink
MrGuedes: There's no negative of let,
AlpheccaStarsLet's not go there, OK?
OK, I hadn't thought about that, but that isn't applyable to "Let's go tomorrow" as a question tag.
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MrGuedesOK, I hadn't thought about that, but that isn't applicable to "Let's go tomorrow" as a question tag.
Quite right.