Are there any films that have had huge influence on language? I understand that Cipher's comment in Matrix ("Buckle up your seatbelt, Dorothy, 'cause Kansas is going bye bye") comes from the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen).
Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms?
Markus
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Markus Appel filted:
Are there any films that have had huge influence on language? I understand that Cipher's comment in Matrix ("Buckle up your seatbelt, Dorothy, 'cause Kansas is going bye bye") comes from the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen).

That's actually a combination of phrases from at least two movies:

"Fasten your seatbelts; it's going to be a bumpy night" from "All About Eve" "I don't think we're in Kansas any more" from "The Wizard Of Oz" (spoken by Dorothy)
If there's a particular film responsible for "going bye bye" I'm not aware of it..
Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms?

Lots...from "you ain't heard nothin' yet" (Al Jolson in "The Jazz Singer") to "my bad" (Alicia Silverstone in "Clueless") and almost certainly beyond...we can only hope that "turkey time, gobble, gobble" (Jennifer Lopez in "Gigli") doesn't find its way into Bartlett's any time soon..r
Are there any films that have had huge influence on language? I understand that Cipher's comment in Matrix ("Buckle up ... from the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen). Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms?

Play it again, Sam.
S&
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Are there any films that have had huge influence on language? I understand that Cipher's comment in Matrix ("Buckle up ... the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen). Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms? Markus

Frankly My Dear, I Don't Give A Damn
Jitze
Are there any films that have had huge influence on ... Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms?

Play it again, Sam.

Which actually was never said in the film.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Markus Appel filted:

Are there any films that have had huge influence on ... from the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen).

That's actually a combination of phrases from at least two movies: "Fasten your seatbelts; it's going to be a bumpy night" from "All About Eve" "I don't think we're in Kansas any more" from "The Wizard Of Oz" (spoken by Dorothy)

It's "Toto I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore".

More:
"Why, I'm not a witch at all."
"Ding, Dong, the witch is dead."
"I'll get you my pretty and your little dog, too." "Follow the yellow brick road."
"What would you do with a brain if you had one?"
"Lions and tigers and bears, oh, my!"
"We're off to see the Wizard."
"Run, Toto, run!"
"I'm melting, melting!"
"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain." "There's no place like home."
And of course,
"Somewhere, over the rainbow..."
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Are there any films that have had huge influence on language? I understand that Cipher's comment in Matrix ("Buckle up ... the Wizard of OZ (which I have never seen). Are there films that either coined or promoted certain phrases/expressions/terms? Markus

"What we have here is a failure to communicate" "Cool Hand Luke". The line delivered by Strother Martin was actually: "What we've got here is failure to communicate", but it seems to be repeated with "have".
Play it again, Sam.

Which actually was never said in the film.

But the film undoubtedly promoted the phrase, in spite of not actually using it. This must be quite difficult to do. I wonder if it would be possible to achieve this feat deliberately?

Alec McKenzie
Which actually was never said in the film.

But the film undoubtedly promoted the phrase, in spite of not actually using it. This must be quite difficult to do. I wonder if it would be possible to achieve this feat deliberately?

I think what's relevant here is that a different movie was made, called "Play it Again, Sam," which was itself a tribute to "Casablanca." That certainly perpetuated the impression that the line was said in "Casablanca."
People often get quotes wrong. It seems to be a natural human tendency to revise them. You can even watch a TV newscaster reading a quote that is displayed on the screen and spot him or her changing the words slightly "a" for "the," dropping a "that," etc.

Best Donna Richoux
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