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The following paragraph will be included in the invitation letter for my motherinlaw. Can anyone help me modify it to be nicer, concise and polite. Please feel free making suggestions. Thank you very much for your help.

Since you will be living and eating with us, you do not need to worry about the accommodation and living expenses; they are on us. Also, since you will do all of the eyesight travels with us on our own car, you do not need to worry about the travel costs; we will cover all such travel costs including any possible ticket fees. Now here is what you should put into your budget for this visit: $2,000 for flights between China and Canada, $1,000 for traveler's health and hospital insurance, and likely $2,000 for shopping for yourself , your family and your friends. These costs totally amount to RMB 30,000, assuming $1 equals to RMB 6.
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Comments  
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Is that Canadian dollars? Then use 'CN$ 2000', etc.

Since you will be staying with us, you do not need to worry about accommodation or living expenses. Also, since you will be sightseeing with us in our own car, you do not need to worry about travel costs.

This is all you need: $2000 return airfare, $1000 for traveler's insurance, and perhaps $2000 for souvenir shopping ( $1 roughly equals RMB 6).
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Thank you, Mister. But I got several questions below highlighting in red.
Mister Micawber.

Is that Canadian dollars? Then use 'CN$ 2000', etc.

Since you will be staying with us, you do not need to worry about accommodation or living expenses. Also, since you will be sightseeing with us in our own car (This sentence sounds to me like that we will stay in the car when watching those landscapes and sights of interest. Do you think so?), you do not need to worry about travel costs.

This is all you need: $2000 return airfare (I was thinking $2000 is for coming and returning, so shall I say $2000 (for?) roundway airfare?), $1000 for traveler's insurance, and perhaps $2000 for souvenir shopping ( $1 roughly equals RMB 6).

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Hi,

I can't resist a small comment about writing CN$ 2000'.

I f you are a Canadian in Canada, writing about Canadian prices and amounts, you don't need to write CN$. That's just assumed.

Just as an American, writing in America, would not typically write USD$2000.

Best wishes, Clive
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Osee: No and no. I have phrased your letter correctly and naturally.
Clive: Writing to a Chinese lady, it is better to be safe and clear; she may not know that there are different currencies in the 2 countries.
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Hi,

Fair enough. Then I'd be inclined to mention, once, in my letter that 'all amounts are shown in Canadian dollars'.

Clive
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Good idea, Clive, but the phrase is too formal-- it sounds like an invoice. Maybe something like this:

This is all you need (in Canadian dollars): $2000 return airfare, $1000 for traveler's insurance, and perhaps $2000 for souvenir shopping ( $1 roughly equals RMB 6).
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Hi again,

Depends on your relationship wih your mother-in-law, I suppose.



Clive
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Well, Osee originally requested revisions to make the letter 'nicer, concise and polite'. That seems to indicate the relationship here.
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