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Hello Englishforum Experts,

Could you help with this task, please?
It was a set of exercises, however, this one seems to be the most complicated.

I'd appreciate your expertise.

Confused student

In each sentence there are four underlined words or phrases (marked A, B, C and D). One of the elements in each sentence is ìncorrect. Identify that element.

It may be [A] the business of lawyers to establish causalitv, yet they are [C] divided on why more and more students are [D] opting at careers in their profession.

“I can't claim I [A] set pulses jumping at a party when I announce I am a solicitor”, says one [C] trust lawyer in [D] a central London firm.

Rodney Austin, dean of University College London [A] with responsibility for admissions to the law faculty, agrees: “l think it’s fair to say that the tedium of much of [C] work of a lawyer escapes aspiring [D] legal students.

Some say it is [A] because of the money .they can expect to make, others say the burgeoning popularity of law degrees is related to the size of student loans, while many believe [C] the raise merely reflects the death of [D] youthful idealism.

[A] However the causes, the better universities, overwhelmed by eager law applicants bearing the promises of [C] straight-A grades in devalued A-levels, last year [D] introduced a new written test to identify the best candidates.

Meanwhile, teenagers - [A] egged on by parents panicking on the prospect of top-up fees and impoverished late middle-age - [C] are forsaking Gibbon and Aristotle and [D] getting down to a life of digesting E.U. directives and competition policy.

Any [A] self-respecting English or history undergraduate of the 1970s or ‘80s understood that law students are tragic and marginalized - too uncool to [C] dabble in theatre or drink too much, too busy even to be [D] hearty rowers or rugby players.

In our more [A] driving society, it is the lawyers and medics who feel sorry for the loafers in the English and sociology departments, those sad souls who will graduate with nothing [C] more tangible than [D] thousands of pounds of debt.

Mr Austin of UCL, who helped [A] draw up the new English aptitude test, reluctantly points to the Grisham effect: “ We've had years of LA Law and Ally McBeal; the law is now so [C] much more part of our culture, it [D] had become somehow a sexy profession.

Hard [A] economics also drives the popularity of law: more people are going to university and there is a clear [C] shift towards vocational degrees – such as law and medicine – as students fret out [D] mounted debts.
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Here are my suggestions.

It may be Emotion: angel the business of lawyers to establish causalitv, yet they are [C] divided on why more and more students are Emotion: drinksopting at careers in their profession.
opting for

"I can't claim I Emotion: angel set pulses jumping at a party when I announce I am a solicitor", says one [C] trust lawyer in Emotion: drinks a central London firm.
that I am a solicitor (Otherwise, it sounds like a direct quote, lacking quotation marks.)

Rodney Austin, dean of University College London Emotion: angel with responsibility for admissions to the law faculty, agrees: "l think it's fair to say that the tedium of much of [C]work of a lawyerescapes aspiring Emotion: drinks legal students.
the work of a lawyer (but I would also put a comma after "London")

Some say it is Emotion: angel because of the money .they can expect to make, others say the burgeoning popularity of law degrees is related to the size of student loans, while many believe [C]the raisemerely reflects the death of Emotion: drinks youthful idealism.
the rise (in the number of students.) (Note: punctuation problems here--I would use a semicolon before "others.")

Emotion: angelHowever the causes, the better universities, overwhelmed by eager law applicants bearing the promises of [C] straight-A grades in devalued A-levels, last year Emotion: drinks introduced a new written test to identify the best candidates.
Whatever the cause

Meanwhile, teenagers - Emotion: angel egged on by parentspanicking onthe prospect of top-up fees and impoverished late middle-age - [C] are forsaking Gibbon and Aristotle and Emotion: drinks getting down to a life of digesting E.U. directives and competition policy.
panicking at

Any Emotion: angel self-respecting English or history undergraduate of the 1970s or ‘80s understood that law students are tragic and marginalized - too uncool to [C] dabble in theatre or drink too much, too busy even to be Emotion: drinkshearty rowers or rugby players.
hardy rowers

In our more Emotion: angeldriving society, it is the lawyers and medics who feel sorry for the loafers in the English and sociology departments, those sad souls who will graduate with nothing [C] more tangible than Emotion: drinks thousands of pounds of debt.
driven society

Mr Austin of UCL, who helped Emotion: angel draw up the new English aptitude test, reluctantly points to the Grisham effect: " We've had years of LA Law and Ally McBeal; the law is now so [C] much more part of our culture, it Emotion: drinkshad become somehow a sexy profession.
has become (to match present tense "is now"). (However, I would be happier with the wording "...much more a part...")

Hard Emotion: angel economics also drives the popularity of law: more people are going to university and there is a clear [C] shift towards vocational degrees - such as law and medicine - as students fret out Emotion: drinksmounted debts.
mounting debts (but don't you meant "fret about"?)

I hope this answers your question.
Comments  
Thank you Doctor D