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Yes, this is the era of the politically correct. Telling it like it is can get a person into serious trouble socially, nowadays. The silliness will pass, you can be sure, but probably not in my or your lifetime.

Poor baby, as the phrase goes. I'm a so-called right-handed person, but use my left hand when manipulating a mouse since it makes better sense to have the mouse on the left if one's pen and paper are to the right. With a bit more practice, I could write nearly as well left-handed as I do the other way, then keeping the mouse on the other side, but there is no point in perfecting that method since our culture writes from left to right, making left-handed writing awkward, at best.
Whine, complain, and feel sorry for themselves as they will, I have little sympathy for the difficulties so-called lefties have, since they are mostly self-imposed, parents and teachers also being responsible. Parents and teachers should encourage children, since they learn quicker than we do, to use whichever hand is best suited for the job, for the child is bound to have an initial preference for one hand over the other, it being only a slight preference in a young person since we're all inclined by our nature to be ambidextrous. Bad habits such as writing with the left hand get ingrained in time. Although they can be unlearned as an adult, the person would be better off not learning them in the first place.
My smoking is much like Coop's and other so-called lefty's writing methods. If I'd never started in admittedly a major error on my part I wouldn't have to worry about the difficulties involved with making a change, now that the habit is seriously ingrained.

One could argue for the advantages of putting warning labels on books that encourage left-handed writing in a left-to-right-writing culture, much as the government insists warning labels appear on packets of our fags, although I think that hardly should be necessary with rational human beings, as most of us are.
A more pressing issue is the poor selection of baseball mitts for southpaws found in your typical sporting goods store.

I was always last-chosen in baseball. I'm a lefty, and my father wouldn't buy me a left-handed mitt. When the ... my right hand, throw off the mitt, transfer the ball back to my left hand, and then throw the ball.

Continue making the excuses we've been hearing from you for years on this issue, if that makes you feel better. I was a so-called right-hander when a kid but had no trouble, as a center fielder, catching the ball with my left hand, then throwing it from my right hand. Because I have good hand-eye coordination, I was a good catcher from the beginning. Because I never practiced much and am not much of an athlete anyway, I was lousy at throwing the ball whether using my right or my left arm, but that had nothing to do with handedness.
Charles Riggs
I was always last-chosen in baseball. I'm a lefty, and my father wouldn't buy me a left-handed mitt. When the ... my right hand, throw off the mitt, transfer the ball back to my left hand, and then throw the ball.

Since a left-handed mitt is actually used on the right hand, why isn't it called a left-hander's (or lefty's) mitt?
Maria Conlon
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I was always last-chosen in baseball. I'm a lefty, and ... back to my left hand, and then throw the ball.

Since a left-handed mitt is actually used on the right hand, why isn't it called a left-hander's (or lefty's) mitt?

One of the reasons men like sports is that logic is not required to either understand or enjoy them.
Continue to examine sports terms, and you will find that a baseball player who "bats left, throws right" actually bats from the (his) right side of the plate. That's how this lefty stands when batting.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Since a left-handed mitt is actually used on the right hand, why isn't it called a left-hander's (or lefty's) mitt?

One of the reasons men like sports is that logic is not required to either understand or enjoy them. Continue ... left, throws right" actually bats from the (his) right side of the plate. That's how this lefty stands when batting.

But to the pitcher, Coop, you're on the left side of the plate. Where you sit depends on where you stand.

Bob Lieblich
BRTR (and very poorly, too)
One of the reasons men like sports is that logic ... of the plate. That's how this lefty stands when batting.

But to the pitcher, Coop, you're on the left side of the plate. Where you sit depends on where you stand.

You think I walk into these things without giving them just a little thought? With Charles and Areff looking over my shoulder?

The references we have to work with are there: the right fielder and the right field stands. Since these are the only two directional indicators of left and right, we have to assume that "right" is the "right" from the catcher's view. There's nothing that supports the pitcher as the point of view. You might as well use the man in the scoreboard that changes the numbers and innings or the peanut vendor.

I believe the arrangement of the batter, fielders, and stands is the same in Brooklyn as in all other ballparks. I'm confident that even Areff will agree on this. Not directly...not his style...but at least with a WCIR,HR.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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But to the pitcher, Coop, you're on the left side of the plate. Where you sit depends on where you stand.

You think I walk into these things without giving them just a little thought? With Charles and Areff looking over ... You might as well use the man in the scoreboard that changes the numbers and innings or the peanut vendor.

Ah, but the fielders are designated as seen by the batter because that's the perspective from which they're observed. The batter, however, is observed from the pitcher's perspective, and secondarily from the fielders'. Perspective. That's why, in football, the left offensive tackle is on the same side of the center as the right defensive tackle. Perspective.
And let's have none of this looking over shoulders, please. It ruins the perspective.
I believe the arrangement of the batter, fielders, and stands is the same in Brooklyn as in all other ballparks.

But I have been told that bowlers in Brooklyn do not acknowledge the label "Brooklyn side" for the 1-2 pocket. They call it the "Jersey side" even though they'd have to face south for that to be in correct perspective. Well, okay, if Muslims can face Mecca to pray, and Jews can face Jeruslem, I guess the bowlers of Brooklyn can face south.
I'm confident that even Areff will agree on this. Not directly...not his style...but at least with a WCIR,HR.

He'll probably lecture us on ballpark hotdogs.

Bob Lieblich
As serious as ever
But I have been told that bowlers in Brooklyn do not acknowledge the label "Brooklyn side" for the 1-2 pocket. ... Muslims can face Mecca to pray, and Jews can face Jeruslem, I guess the bowlers of Brooklyn can face south.

Brooklyn (FLCIA) itself faces south.
...
} He'll probably lecture us on ballpark hotdogs.
Next year in Brooklyn!

R. J. Valentine
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}
}> But I have been told that bowlers in Brooklyn do not acknowledge the }> label "Brooklyn side" for the 1-2 pocket. They call it the "Jersey }> side" even though they'd have to face south for that to be in }> correct perspective. Well, okay, if Muslims can face Mecca to pray, }> and Jews can face Jeruslem, I guess the bowlers of Brooklyn can face }> south.
}
} Brooklyn (FLCIA) itself faces south.
The BOTSOTIC (LRCCIA) faces north, but a lot of churches face east.

R. J. Valentine
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