1 « 19 20  22 23 » 31
That left-handed people type with their right hand presumably as ... in the head, not that I necessarily support that view.

It certainly is all in the head! Just as intelligence, humour, ethical views and poetry are all in the head.

OK then. Lefties don't have different wiring from their brain to their hands, they only think they do.
Left handers use their left-hand better than their right, even when typing, the qwerty keyboard has all the common letters for the left-hand, so left handers have an advantage using it.

If the letters that most often appear are etaino, they are equally divided. Not by plan, you can be sure, since the layout of the qwerty keyboard was designed to slow typists down so as not to jam the keys of the ancient typewriter.

Charles Riggs
That left-handed people type with their right hand presumably as ... in the head, not that I necessarily support that view.

This left handed person types better with his left than his right. I've observed a few others like that, and ... sure I would have remembered as being interestingly counter-intuitive. I'm not sure what you mean by "all in the head".

I meant they may well be exaggerating their disability by assuming an inability to use their right hand effectively was because their other hand responded better when they were young. My claim is that both hands of a physically and mentally average human can function equally well, or very nearly so. I certainly don't advocate slapping students who refuse to write with the hand best suited for the western way of writing, but I think parents should encourage their children to practice all manner of activities with both hands, additionally pointing out the advantages of writing with the right hand.
It's quite natural that a hand which is used more for finely discriminated movements will over the years develop more finely discriminating innervation in that hand, just as the hand which holds the hammer will become stronger.

How do you explain the fact that my left hand is around 10 per cent stronger than my right one even though I use my right hand for more activities than I do my left one? My high school gym teacher, who had the measuring device, said this is not at all unusual.
Charles Riggs
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
That left-handed people type with their right hand presumably as ... in the head, not that I necessarily support that view.

The strange part is that on a Qwerty keyboard the most-used letters are on the left.

Disputed in two posts, elsewhere.
Although I'm a right-hander, I find certain words like "apology" quite difficult to type, or at least I have to think about them.

Never apologize said that man's man of man's men John Wayne. As an aside, I wonder if Coop can type 'Mea culpa' at all, let alone with difficulty.

Charles Riggs
At least one study (I'll look up the citation next ... or poorly handwritten would get a B+ if handwritten well.)

It sounds as if the examiners need some adjustment! That really is dreadful discrimination. I suppose that it could be ... handwriting and either up the grades of those that are bad (or typed), or reduce those that are wrongly upgraded.

Since few schools hold exams in handwriting, how otherwise can a teacher indicate to her students that their handwriting is poor ? If grades are to be used at all, why not have them take the student's overall performance into account? If a person has sloppy handwriting, surely they should be encouraged to improve it. For most people it is as important, probably much more so, in life as the algebra they spent so much time mastering.

Charles Riggs
At least one study (I'll look up the citation next ... or poorly handwritten would get a B+ if handwritten well.)

Woe be the day I crossposted to alt.lefthanders, not that KG is moaning about so-called left-handedness in this particular post.
I don't doubt it. If you are struggling to read something (particularly something like an essay, where the marking is ... a certain prejudice against a type of "girlie" handwriting with hearts over the i's accompanied by decorations and/or irrelevant pictures.

I agree. :-{

Charles Riggs
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It certainly is all in the head! Just as intelligence, humour, ethical views and poetry are all in the head.

OK then. Lefties don't have different wiring from their brain to their hands, they only think they do.

You mean 'different from right-handers', presumably. If so, then you are wrong, there is plenty of empirical evidence that left-handed brains certainly are wired differently. It is beyond contention.
Left handers use their left-hand better than their right, even ... the left-hand, so left handers have an advantage using it.

If the letters that most often appear are etaino, they are equally divided. Not by plan, you can be sure, since the layout of the qwerty keyboard was designed to slow typists down so as not to jam the keys of the ancient typewriter.

Yes, that is said to be the plan. It helps left-handers.

Pure letter frequency is a little simplistic. ETA, the most frequent letters, are on the left, they account for more characters by a large margin than the remainder, INO. To be precise, the frequency of ETA = .124167 + .0969225 + .082011 = .3030906 and that of INO = .0768052 + .0764055 + .0714095 = .2246202, giving the ratio of .134, meaning that the left hand is used 34% more for the top six letters! Quite a significant margin of advantage...
Not only that, but if you look at the letter frequency most likely to follow 'e', it is RSND, of which only 'N' is on the right. Thus, with 'e' turning up 12.4% of the time, the left hand will be used for the next letter at the very least, a further 11% (actually higher), magnifying the left-handed advantage further.
It's obvious, if you are a full tough-typist, your left hand operates much like the right hand on the piano, with the right hand filling in letters on a much less frequent basis - roughly it feels as if you type around three letters with your left-hand for every one with your right.

Death, after all, is the ultimate analgesic. - Prof. A.C Grayling, BMJ Editorial 'Right to Die' 9/4/205
* TagZilla 0.057 * http://tagzilla.mozdev.org
It sounds as if the examiners need some adjustment! That ... bad (or typed), or reduce those that are wrongly upgraded.

Since few schools hold exams in handwriting, how otherwise can a teacher indicate to her students that their handwriting is ... people it is as important, probably much more so, in life as the algebra they spent so much time mastering.

That only has any validity because it is so unlikely that anybody ever uses their algebra! A rather less than honest comparison.

My recommendation is to allow typing, teach it and encourage it. That puts everybody on an equal footing in this regard. Any other route is unfair.

"Perhaps I intended you to say so, but I meant self-command. You had, somehow or other, broken bounds yesterday, and run away from your own management; but to-day you are got back again and as I cannot be always with you, it is best to believe your temper under your own command rather than mine." Emma, Jane Austen
* TagZilla 0.057 * http://tagzilla.mozdev.org
/a / the Educational Testing Service (ETS) now asks all exam-takers to indicate (on their application to take a test) ... left-hander who indicated left-handedness before the test but who then found himself/herself having to take the exam with unsuitable seating

I find it astounding that we can't design a simple thing like a desk with a writing surface that, if it absolutely has to be one-sided, cannot be made removable or flippable in some way that enables it to be placed on either side. We'd then only need one design of desk that would suit everybody. They used to make tramcars ("trolleys" I think for Americans) with flippable backrests that would easly permit the seats to face either way, so the vehicle didn't need to be turned round. This sort of thing is not rocket science, it hardly costs anything, and you'd think that anybody with a vested interest in making things would see it as politically and commercially advantageous to make them suitable for all.

Rod.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
The strange part is that on a Qwerty keyboard the most-used letters are on the left. Although I'm a right-hander, I find certain words like "apology" quite difficult to type, or at least I have to think about them.

Just say "sorry" instead, and be thankful you're not German. :-)

Rod.
Show more