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This lefty uses clippers not scissors, but clips the right fingernails (clipper in the left hand) with the right hand palm-up and fingers curled. and the left fingernails (with the clipper in the right hand) with the left hand palm down and the fingers extended.

Yes, my exact mirror image. Only the hand position, I haste to add.
ASCII to ASCII, DOS to DOS
Voice recognition is the way of the future.

It's going to have to get a lot better probably to nearly flawless accuracy. When I'm typing, I can often tell ... with a system that's as good as a good secretary taking dictation, I don't see it actually replacing typing.

I think that your approach is wrong - to work efficiently with voice recognition, you should dictate a larger amount of text without watching, then proofread the whole - as with a secretary.
Bill Gates working as a waiter:
- Waiter, there's a fly in my soup
- Try again, maybe it won't be there this time
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Oliver Cromm filted:
This lefty uses clippers not scissors, but clips the right ... with the left hand palm down and the fingers extended.

Yes, my exact mirror image. Only the hand position, I haste to add.

Clippers here too, but the position is symmetrical for me: palm of the objective hand down, fingers extended and slightly spread, clipper held in thumb and forefinger of the other hand with the butt of it wedged into nature's snuffbox..r
Kate Gladstone turpitued:
invented my own script designed to avoid degeneration under speed. It

I would very much like to see the writing-style you invented, Chris. I often find people who have improved a formerly illegible handwriting by inventing their own style.

I also invented my own script in my high school years. Not so much for legibility as to improve my writing speed by eliminating time-wasting twiddles and by having the pen moving in the right direction, where possible, between strokes. Some years later I realised that my script was almost identical to the way primary school teachers were being taught to write.
These "home-grown improvement" scripts, whether made by left-handers or right-handers, usually have various important features in common, and on these ... a handwriting-consultant for those who have not had the luck/persistence/insight to come up with this sort of thing for themselves.

The most obvious feature of my writing is that I don't join adjacent letters except where the pen is already in a good starting position for the next letter. In addition my writing is a lot less "curly" than the cursive script I was originally taught. There's a certain amount of context dependence, i.e. the shape of a letter can depend on which letters come before and after.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Voice recognition is the way of the future.

It's going to have to get a lot better probably to nearly flawless accuracy.

It is already a lot better: a lot better than the early Navy systems I saw in the 1970s, anyway. It isn't flawless no technology is but it is entirely practical to use, even today.
Until and unless somebody comes up with a system that's as good as a good secretary taking dictation, one that's ... to the extent that you dont monitor it for errors while you talk, I don't see it actually replacing typing.

It already has for many people. David Pogue of the New York Times dictates all his columns using Dragon's NaturallySpeaking. After a certain amount of training, it makes very few mistakes, he reports. I find it to be less perfect, but I've spent only a few hours working with it.
There is no question in my mind that, especially with notebooks getting smaller and increasingly taking over the market, typing will become largely a thing of the past within the next 10 to 20 years.
Charles Riggs
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Peter H.M. Brooks filted:

Yes. The claim is that the Dvorak keyboard works better ... bored, I might teach myself Dvorak and test this theory.

When I dabbled in Dvorak for a while, back in the mid-80s, what most struck me was not a change in the division of labor between the left and right hand but rather that the fingers of both hands left the home row less often..r

That being the impetus behind the layout change. I tried it but wasn't able to get used to it; then again, I only spent an hour or two fiddling with it. Too bad we all didn't start out with one.
Charles Riggs
Voice recognition is the way of the future.

I've heard people say so, but the picture that pops into my mind is of an enormous room filled with people yakking at their computers. We're all going to be working in an environment modeled after call centers. Warm and fuzzy? I don't think so.

Then there's the office joker who will run into the room shouting "ERASE! DELETE!" :-)

Chris Malcolm (Email Removed) +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205 IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK (http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/)
I have never tried voice recognition software, but I have observed other people attempting to use it, some years ago.
The results ranged from very good through hilariously bad to completely useless.
The problem was not in the software, but in the users.

We learn to write. We learn to type. Why should we not learn to speak so that we can be understood by voice recognition software?
There is no question in my mind that, especially with notebooks getting smaller and increasingly taking over the market, typing will become largely a thing of the past within the next 10 to 20 years.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
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I have never tried voice recognition software, but I have observed other people attempting to use it, some years ago. ... learn to type. Why should we not learn to speak so that we can be understood by voice recognition software?

A programmer working for me a few years ago lost, for most practical purposes, the use of her hands. We equipped her with voice recognition software and she has continued as a software developer for years now. She spent a few months getting it working to her own voice and has been perfectly proficient ever since; the only issue is that she must work in a quiet place, away from other people: even with a specialist microphone, background chatter, telephones ringing and people walking past seriously downgrade the effectives of the software.
So voice recognition software will require everybody to have a private office.

David
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