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I don't doubt it. If you are struggling to read something (particularly something like an essay, where the marking is ... a certain prejudice against a type of "girlie" handwriting with hearts over the i's accompanied by decorations and/or irrelevant pictures.

Handwriting with circles/hearts/pictures/other decorations also vastly slows down the writer. Some teen-aged girls have found this out to their sorrow when taking timed examinations ... a few, at least, have (unsuccessfully) protested against timed examinations on the grounds that imposing a time-limit "unfairly" forces them to modify their handwriting if they want to finish in time.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= Kate Gladstone - (Email Removed)
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That only has any validity because it is so unlikely that anybody ever uses their algebra! A rather less than honest comparison.

MDs and nurses tell me that they use algebra, e.g.,to figure the proper amount and rate of administration for anesthetic.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= Kate Gladstone - (Email Removed)
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Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
My recommendation is to allow typing, teach it and encourage it. That puts everybody on an equal footing ...

... except for the people who cannot, despite their best efforts, type legibly at a reasonable speed.

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I also invented my own script in my high school years. Not so much for legibility as to improve my ... later I realised that my script was almost identical to the way primary school teachers were being taught to write.

I've seen the handwriting-models presented to (and by) primary-school teachers in Australia (where Peter lives), and they indeed far excel what USA schoolkids/teachers usually get. The Australian primary-school writing-styles (like what Peter came up with, and also like what I do), indeed ...
... don't join adjacent letters except where the pen is already in a good starting position for the next letter.

Their scripts, and Peter's and mine, also agree in looking:
... a lot less "curly" than the cursive script I was originally taught.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= Kate Gladstone - (Email Removed)
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Later I discovered a proposed English alphabet, which Bernard Shaw ... thing I've continued to useit for is my personal diary.

Ah, the Shavian alphabet. I once tried to master it, but never could remember what letter went with a given sound. For others who feel interested, Google-searching will unearth an abundance of web-pages about (and, some of them, partly in) Shavian writing.

Penguin became interested and not long after
Shaw's death published an edition of Androcles
and the Lion (with facing pages in conventional
orthography, I think) that may be in some libraries and presumably judged the experiment a failure.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Re:

I was simply thinking of the fact that German for ... seem to have unusually long words for many common things.

Well, I've just started studying Korean, and (to judge from what I've learned in the very, very few lessons I've ... like "I want a drink") requires about 2 to 3 times as many spoken syllables in Korean as in English.

Ask your teacher to tell you how Korean script (one of the world's best inventions) differs from Korean words.
To put it simply, Korean words have emerged from Chinese. This is why most Korean signs have both the Korean (phonetic) and the Chinese (idogramatic) script. Older Koreans will explain (just as older more educated English people will as regards English and Latin or Ancient Greek) just how the Chinese has influenced the Korean.

There's an argument that you can't understand Korean properly without knowing Chinese first.
All persons are deemed to have a right to equality of treatment, except when some recognised social expediency requires the reverse. And hence all social inequalities which have ceased to be considered expedient, assume the character not of simple inexpediency, but of injustice, and appear so tyrannical, that people are apt to wonder how they ever could have been tolerated; forgetful that they themselves perhaps tolerate other inequalities under an equally mistaken notion of expediency, the correction of which would make that which they approve seem quite as monstrous as what they have at last learnt to condemn.

The entire history of social improvement has been a series of transitions, by which one custom or institution after another, from being a supposed primary necessity of social existence, has passed into the rank of an universally stigmatized injustice and tyranny. So it has been with the distinctions of slaves and freemen, nobles and serfs, patricians and plebeians; and so it will be, and in part already is, with the aristocracies of colour, race, and sex.

J.S.Mill Chapter V. Utilitarianism
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That only has any validity because it is so unlikely that anybody ever uses their algebra! A rather less than honest comparison.

MDs and nurses tell me that they use algebra, e.g.,to figure the proper amount and rate of administration for anesthetic.

I suppose that, in a simple minded way, they do as they put numbers into a formula - in other words providing knowns for the unknowns.

It is a rather trivial case, though. Algebra really ought to involve solving quadratic or simultaneous equations at the least!

O how I cried when Alice died
The day we were to have wed!
We never had our Roasted Duck
And now she's a Loaf of Bread!
At nights I weep an cannot sleep,
Moonlight to me recalls
I never saw her Waterfront
Nor she my Waterfalls
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MDs and nurses tell me that they use algebra, e.g.,to figure the proper amount and rate of administration for anesthetic.

I suppose that, in a simple minded way, they do as they put numbers into a formula - in other words providing knowns for the unknowns.

Simple algebra is still algebra.
It is a rather trivial case, though. Algebra really ought to involve solving quadratic or simultaneous equations at the least!

Not if they aren't required for the proper administration of the anaesthetic.

Charles Riggs
There are no accented letters in my email address
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Re:
Well, I've just started studying Korean, and (to judge from ... times as many spoken syllables in Korean as in English.

Ask your teacher to tell you how Korean script (one of the world's best inventions) differs from Korean words.

I work with recordings, so far, not (yet) books or personal instruction, but have just recently started teaching myself Korean writing from some of the many web-sites about it.
To put it simply, Korean words have emerged from Chinese.

All Korean words? Or just a lot of them? Some of the Korean words I've learned so far resemble Chinese words, but many of them sound nothing at all like Chinese.
This is why most Korean signs have both the Korean (phonetic) and the Chinese (idogramatic) script.

Hmmm ... signs in Korean neighborhoods in the USA (and also, from what I can find out, signs in North Korea) have only Korean script, not Chinese script. (Signs from South Korea, of which I've seen photos on the Net, do have the occasional Chinese character along with Korean writing.)

If "Korean words ... emerged from Chinese, (and) ... this is why ... Korean signs have ... Chinese (ideogrammatic) script," then why does South Korea but not North Korea (or any "Koreatown" areas in NYC or elsewhere) have Chinese script on the signs? I guess the North Koreans find Chinese characters "politically incorrect" or something, for some peculiarly North Korean reason - but why would South Korean expatriates in the USA also not use them?
And ... if the "Korean words emerged from Chinese," how did the Koreans talk to each other in all the millennia before Chinese people came to Korea?
Older Koreans will explain (just as older more educated English people will as regards English and Latin or Ancient Greek) just how the Chinese has influenced the Korean.

Oh, you just mean that Chinese influenced Korean, not (what it looked as if you'd said) that Korean "emerged" from Chinese.
There's an argument that you can't understand Korean properly without knowing Chinese first.

Please detail that argument, because (if the argument holds true) then just how do Korean kids ever learn to speak and understand Korean (since they presumably don't "know Chinese first" before they acquire their native language)?
;-)
I just want to know ...

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