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} On an arguably even more herterodox note, up in hthe neighborhood of Boston } we are creditably informed by ... } highways that "Cambridge Points North". IDNKT, though posting from theWorld (whose current location is something of a mystery). Thanks.

Of course, by the time they finish the Big Dig, who knows? Cambridge may be pointing in a different direction altogether.
Heck, the earth's axis will probably be pointing in a wholly different direction by then.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Has it ever occurred to you to pick up your pen with your other hand? A hand is a hand, ... Good thing most, if not all, pens aren't right-handed or any number of lefties would be bitching about them too.

I'm left-handed, and while I can cut right-handed with no real problems, my right-handed writing is exceptionally slow and much more illegible than my left-handed writing. What I'm trying to say is that swapping hands to write with is much more difficult than you suggest - try writing left-handed at your normal speed and legibility, and you will see what I mean. It IS possible to adapt, but it takes a lot of commitment, and for most people the adaption will not be as good as their natural inclination. Perhaps if you tried to use both hands from childhood the adaption would be easier, but changing in adulthood isn't
And why are left-handed people often such whiners? I've known any number of people with truly disabling conditions who complain far less about them, if at all. I'm one of them myself, and that's all you'll be likely to hear from me on the subject.

Perhaps it is because they feel that much of the situations they encounter that disadvantage them could be overcome with a little consideration from the world? (I'm perfectly happy to accept that spiral bound notebooks should have the spirals on the side where they will inconvenience the fewest people, but if I have to use public computers where the mouse mats are glued down onto the right side, someone is going to get a smack in the face).
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(snip)
I'm left-handed, and while I can cut right-handed with no real problems, my right-handed writing is exceptionally slow and much ... Perhaps if you tried to use both hands from childhood the adaption would be easier, but changing in adulthood isn't

It was policy in the schools I attended as a child to force lefties to use their right-hand. Consequently, I now write right-handed, but still use my left-hand for many other things. At one time, with a lot of practice, I was able to write left-handed fairly well, but since there was no real need for it, I dropped it and now could only write left-handed with a great deal of trouble. My regular writing is quite often unintelligible even so and I prefer to type when it is essential to make sure that the intended reader can read it.

David Wright Sr.
Have you ever stopped to think, and
forgot to start again?
To e-mail me, remove 't' from dwrightsr
You get used to cutting with right-handed scissors and writing on notebooks that are spiral-bound just where your hand wants to be.

Has it ever occurred to you to pick up your pen with your other hand? A hand is a hand, ... thank goodness, the most adaptable of all animals. Funny how some don't take advantage of that skill. Charles Riggs

We are more adaptable than chameleons!
Good thing most, if not all, pens aren't right-handed or any number of lefties would be bitching about them too.

For some reason, the nuns would not allow us to use ball-point pens. The "cartridge pens" we used were definitely right-handed. This lefthander had to work hard to keep the edge of his hand out of the still-wet ink when writing. I always thought this (and the easily smeared graphite of the soft pencils we used in grammar school) explained (at least in part) the hooked manner with which a lefty holds his pen. I don't use "wet ink" pens much anymore, and the hook in my grip has largely straightened out.

J.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
(snip)

I'm left-handed, and while I can cut right-handed with no ... the adaption would be easier, but changing in adulthood isn't

It was policy in the schools I attended as a child to force lefties to use their right-hand. Consequently, I ... Wright Sr. Have you ever stopped to think, and forgot to start again? To e-mail me, remove 't' from dwrightsr

One can analogize the right handed lefted handedness, with gay and straightness. If one is born a certain way, then that is what one is, it would be much more difficult to pretend to be something else. There were societies which scorned lefties, as much as our society scorns gays. Both kind of ridiculous.
It was policy in the schools I attended as a child to force lefties to use their right-hand. Consequently, I ... so and I prefer to type when it is essential to make sure that the intended reader can read it.

My aunt was forced by teachers to write with her right hand despite being a natural-born left-hander. She developed psychological problems later in her childhood, which her family thought were exacerbated by being forced to use the wrong hand.
I have no idea if brains can go wrong that way she also was a forceps birth, and then there's just plain bad luck.

SML
And why are left-handed people often such whiners? I've known any number of people with truly disabling conditions who complain far less about them, if at all. I'm one of them myself, and that's all you'll be likely to hear from me on the subject.

It's righties who are the whiners. If a righty has to sit down behind a left handed computer, you'll hear about it approximately 100% of the time. They can't deal with it. The same goes for giving them lefty scissors.

Besides, if you cross-post to alt.lefthanders, it makes as much sense for people to whine about these things as it makes for you to whine about English usage.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I think that's rather harsh. I'm a lefty, and it's caused me some minor problems over the years, but I wouldn't even begin to compare it to being gay. Society has made some stupid jokes about my left-handedness, the nuns gave me a few wrist-whacks, but no one's ever really disapproved of me for being left-handed. Even those that don't think it's "right" end up overlooking this sinister aspect when they get to know me. No one's ever suggested that a "program" will cure me or offered to pray over me.
Even in today's world where we are much less homophobic, the gay never knows when there will be something really hostile directed his or her way.
I wouldn't even compare being left-handed to a stammer or a stutter. At most, being left-handed is about on par with male pattern baldness (of which I am also a victim). I don't try to change being left-handed, and I wouldn't wear a toupee.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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