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Charles Riggs turpitued:
As for scissors, I found yesterday I can use a right-handed pair in my left hand nearly as well as ... way, but I have taught myself not to be a whiner. I was one at one stage in my life.

I've been surprised to see this statement, from you and others, about scissors. My experience is that if I use right-handed scissors with my left hand, the blades get pushed apart when my fingers are supposed to be pushing them together. That means that the blades don't mesh as well, and the cutting ability is diminished.

Of course with very well-made scissors these lateral forces won't have much effect; the blades are held in contact with nuts and bolts and even, in the up-market models, with some sort of spring-loading. Nevertheless, there is always some effect. Scissors are designed in such a way that "normal" use will force the blades closer together as you operate them. This not only improves the cutting action, but provides a modicum of self-sharpening. Designing scissors that worked equally well with either hand would probably require some sort of three-blade arrangement. (Although I confess I can't see how to do the job.)

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Kate Gladstone turpitued:
Saddest day of my life as a handwriting-teacher: the first of several times that I got an e-mail from a ... kids to wear mittens on their left hand at all times in the classroom? Or what method should be used?"

One of my primary schools had a much more direct method: a sharp rap on the knuckles with the edge of a metal ruler whenever anyone was caught writing with the left hand. (I sometimes wondered whether this broke any bones.) This left left-handers unable to write with either hand. Of course this was easier to justify when "everyone knew" that left-handedness was a mark of the devil. Perhaps that's why Catholic schools no longer emply nuns as teachers.

Luckily I was right-handed and escaped this, but I felt sorry for the girl in my class who had permanently bruised knuckles. I got my own share of the strap - which also leaves your hands too painful to hold a pen - but that's a different story.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Kate Gladstone turpitued:
/3/ Some evidence exist that the muscular feedback involved in writing letters by hand often improves a learner's memory for ... of learning to compose accurately/easily/fluently) to a degree that does not happen with the simpler muscular feedback involved in keyboarding

Do you have any references for that? I've been trying to tell my colleagues that students who copy notes from a blackboard learn better than those who watch a Powerpoint presentation while eating popcorn. (In fact, I'd like to get Powerpoint banned from university lectures, which would be a complete reversal of current trends.) Unfortunately, I haven't had the time to collect the hard evidence for my assertions.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
So how on earth can you see what you're writing, since your hand must cover what you've written.

Since I "gave up" upside-down writing in grade school, I had to test this since I can still do it. ... In my grade school days, we used the stick pen and an inkwell in the desktop. No sand shakers, though.

We never had sand shakers - blotting paper - mine was permanently covered in doodles or else completely soaked in ink. And those pens did become left or right handed after use. In fact, if you borrowed someone else's pen, you had to adopt the exact slope they used, or else the thing wouldn't work.
I miss the obligatory sucking of the new pen nib, which was alleged to help make the ink stick to the nib. Also the chewing of the wooden pen holder.

Rob Bannister
Kate Gladstone turpitued:

/3/ Some evidence exist that the muscular feedback involved in ... not happen with the simpler muscular feedback involved in keyboarding

Do you have any references for that? I've been trying to tell my colleagues that students who copy notes from ... a complete reversal of current trends.) Unfortunately, I haven't had the time to collect the hard evidence for my assertions.

Just from observation, the one sure way of ensuring students learn nothing is to give them photocopied notes.

Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I see there is no such group as alt.righthanders. If ... wouldn't we have a group to further push our agenda?

No need. 89% of people are right handed, so, with such an overwhelming majority it is possible to persecute the ... Not because the majority is necessarily more evil than the minority, but, again, simply because their power renders them dangerous.

I once had the misfortune to share a flat with a left-hander who claimed to be an artist. I had, of course, no objection to his left-handedness, but I did object to his constant lectures about how left handers were bound to be more artistic. He had the cheek to call my drawings "scientific", while I made no comment about his daubs. I did my best to persecute him.

Rob Bannister
Charles Riggs turpitued:

As for scissors, I found yesterday I can use a ... whiner. I was one at one stage in my life.

I've been surprised to see this statement, from you and others, about scissors. My experience is that if I use ... hand would probably require some sort of three-blade arrangement. (Although I confess I can't see how to do the job.)

Agreed. I can use scissors with my left hand, but it takes quite an effort to hold them in what feels to be an unnatural grip to make them work.

Rob Bannister
Kate Gladstone turpitued:

/3/ Some evidence exist that the muscular feedback involved in ... not happen with the simpler muscular feedback involved in keyboarding

Do you have any references for that? I've been trying to tell my colleagues that students who copy notes from ... (In fact, I'd like to get Powerpoint banned from university lectures, which would be a complete reversal of current trends.)

There's also an argument to be made that having to write (and to choose what to write) on the blackboard ensures that the material of the lecture passes through the lecturer's mind in some manner, however cursory, during the lecture. Powerpoint is a good way of avoiding that, too.
Unfortunately, I haven't had the time to collect the hard evidence for my assertions.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Designing scissors that worked equally well with either hand would probably require some sort of three-blade arrangement.  (Although I confess I can't see how to do the job.)

Symetrical handles will do the trick. Chinese scissors are often made this way. Some examples googled up at random:
http://homeharvest.com/propagationtools.htm
http://hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu/exhibitions/previous/jim-dine/scissors.html http://www.action-electronics.com/scissors.htm

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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