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Hemostats are also "right-handed". The ratchets work easier for the right-handed. I can close them easily, but opening them is difficult. It's the pressure thing again.

This is one reason for the higher mortality reported in left-handers. Safety guards are designed for right-handers and make the job more difficult, sometimes, like this, in subtle ways. The response of many left-handers is to disable the safety mechanism (or, in this case, not use the ratchet) this leads to more accidents.

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Kate Gladstone turpitued:

Saddest day of my life as a handwriting-teacher: the first ... times in the classroom? Or what method should be used?"

One of my primary schools had a much more direct method: a sharp rap on the knuckles with the edge ... knew" that left-handedness was a mark of the devil. Perhaps that's why Catholic schools no longer emply nuns as teachers.

Are there any nuns available to teach? I would think that the population of nuns in western countries has declined dramatically during my lifetime.
Luckily I was right-handed and escaped this, but I felt sorry for the girl in my class who had permanently ... the strap - which also leaves your hands too painful to hold a pen - but that's a different story.

Dad, now nearly 80, attended a formal prep school and then minor English Public School. They didn't make any attempt to "cure" him of his left-handedness, although for some reason he can't now remember he bats right handed.

David
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Dad, now nearly 80, attended a formal prep school and then minor English Public School. They didn't make any attempt to "cure" him of his left-handedness, although for some reason he can't now remember he bats right handed.

There can be odd variations like this in a normal left-hander. I know that, when I first started to play cricket, I found it difficult to tell which was my preferred stance, so I played two or three games one way and two or three another - both felt awkward to me and, in the end, I gave up cricket. I could imagine that, had I hit a four or a six at any time during this experimental phase, I'd would have decided that whichever stance I was trying must be the correct one.

I had the same problem learning guitar, I strung it left-handed and it felt awkward, then right and it felt awkward again. In the end I gave up the guitar. It was much easier with the trumpet, after deciding that I was enjoying, as an adult, learning it, I ordered a left-handed trumpet and I've been delighted with the improvement!

"It is the mark of a civilised man, and a hallmark of his culture, that he applies no more precision to a problem than its nature permits, or its solution demands." - Aristotle
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Dad, now nearly 80, attended a formal prep school and then minor English Public School. They didn't make any attempt to "cure" him of his left-handedness, although for some reason he can't now remember he bats right handed.

My mother, who died in 2003 at the age of 91, was similarly left-handed and public-school educated, and no-one had ever tried to train her out of it. Nor did anything like this happen to anyone at my own schools or my chidren's. Was it actually done in any schools in the UK within living memory?
My mother apparently adapted to a right-handed world, though; she had no trouble with right-handed secateurs or scissors.

Katy Jennison
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Dad, now nearly 80, attended a formal prep school and ... some reason he can't now remember he bats right handed.

My mother, who died in 2003 at the age of 91, was similarly left-handed and public-school educated, and no-one had ... living memory? My mother apparently adapted to a right-handed world, though; she had no trouble with right-handed secateurs or scissors.

I'll check with my husband later but he has always claimed that, at the (private) primary school he attended, they tried to stop him using his left hand. He has a certain level of ambidexterity as a result but his handwriting is pretty appalling.

Laura
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No need. 89% of people are right handed, so, with ... minority, but, again, simply because their power renders them dangerous.

I once had the misfortune to share a flat with a left-hander who claimed to be an artist. I had, ... to call my drawings "scientific", while I made no comment about his daubs. I did my best to persecute him.

I knew a right hander who used to beat people up at school. I knew another who had problems with basic reasoning skills, and one who had no sense of fashion. I knew yet another who used to scream uncontrollably for no apparent reason. I had no problem with their handedness, but I did object to them assuming that anybody should merely be able to switch hands if something is not convenient, yet that "rule" doesn't apply to righties.

If you had no objection to your flatmate's handedness, this never would have come up. It came up because he was left handed. Had he been a right handed axe murderer, you never would have mentioned his handedness at all. But if you were left handed, he might have made a point of letting you know his handedness.
I once had the misfortune to share a flat with ... about his daubs. I did my best to persecute him.

This is an unremarkably common error of thought. People read of the fact that Einstein, or a number of other ... be a genius. The error is simply mistaking if A then B for if and only if A then B.

The other mistake is assuming that what you read is true. We all know that Einstein failed mathematics as a youth. In fact, the only people who did not seem to know this were Einstein and his teachers who thought he did very well.
I knew a right hander who used to beat people up at school. I knew another who had problems with ... anybody should merely be able to switch hands if something is not convenient, yet that "rule" doesn't apply to righties.

I used to work with someone who was naturally right-handed, but had been in an accident, and broke his arm, when he was in primary school. He was taught to write left-handed, and still wrote that way - though his writing was appalling. He could actually write more legibly right-handed, but was just used to using his left hand that he continued to write left-handed.
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My mother, who died in 2003 at the age of 91, was similarly left-handed and public-school educated, and no-one had ... at my own schools or my chidren's. Was it actually done in any schools in the UK within living memory?

Coming in on this thread partway through..
My mother, born 1904, was lefthanded and at school she got a ruler across her left hand every time she tried to use it for writing or drawing. She wrote righthanded until her fifties, when she got arthritis in her right hand and re-learnt to write with the left. The two hadnwritings are very different and I have a vague intention of submitting them one day to a handwriting expert for comment.
This is, I suppose, not quite living memory, but close. Father-in-law, whom I could have asked till last year, and who was born 1902, was unfortunately righthanded.
Katy
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