+0
Hi

I am doing a course in English grammar and the topic we are dealing with now is finite and non finite clauses.

I am still a bit confused about it. I was wondering if you could help me to identify the finite and non finite clauses and their types of the following sentences. Please correct me if I am wrong.

1- A single wall separated their lives but if he placed his ear to it he could hear her move about.

A single wall separated their lives - finite clause (don't know the type)
but if he placed his ear to it - finite clause (don't know the type)
he could hear - finite clause (don't know the type)
her move about - non finite clause (infinitive?)

2- I do not think, comrades, that I shall be with you for very much longer, and before I die, I feel it my duty to pass on to you such wisdom as I have acquired.

I do not think, comrades - finite clause (don't know the type)
That I shall be with you for very much longer - finite clause (don't know the type)
and before I die - non finite (infinitive?)
I feel it my duty - finite (don't know the type)
to pass on to you such wisdom - non finite (infinitive)
as I have acquried - finite (don't know the type)

Please give me your opinion about it.

I appreciate
1 2
Comments  
Hello Susan-- and welcome to English Forums.

1- A single wall separated their lives but if he placed his ear to it he could hear her move about.

A single wall separated their lives - finite clause (don't know the type)-- Yes, an independent clause
if he placed his ear to it - finite clause (don't know the type-- dependent conditional)
but...he could hear her move about - finite clause (independent)
move about - non-finite clause (infinitive, object complement)

2- I do not think, comrades, that I shall be with you for very much longer, and before I die, I feel it my duty to pass on to you such wisdom as I have acquired.

I do not think, comrades...much longer - finite clause (don't know the type-- independent)
That I shall be with you for very much longer - finite clause (don't know the type-- relative, object of verb)
before I die - finite (dependent subordinate)
and...I feel it my duty - finite (independent)
to pass on to you such wisdom...acquired - non-finite (infinitive)
as I have acquired - finite (don't know the type-- Nor I, offhand)
Hi

Thank you for ur help but I am still very confused about it. As your classification differs from mine. Can you please use the classification of finite or non-finite clauses and their types? rather then independent or relative, because every non-finite clause must not be indenpendent. Also, do you know the differente types of finite clauses? as non-finite clauses are gerund, infinitive and participle.

Thank you
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
susanagomes2- I do not think, comrades, that I shall be with you for very much longer, and before I die, I feel it my duty to pass on to you such wisdom as I have acquired.
I am not familiar with the classification of clauses used in the Anglo-Saxon world by many natives, but one thing is crystal-clear: ... that I shall be with you for very much longer is not a relative clause. That is a conjunction. If it were a relative, it would need an antecedent in the main clause.

The only way to have a relative clause after I do not think would be to make the entire main clause the antecedent, which would require which: I do not think, which is a sign of stupidity.

CB
Yes, sorry CB-- I always get that one wrong, don't I.

Susan, I have left your finite/non-finite classifications, only correcting the one that was wrong (in bold).
Hi guys,

Thank you for ur comments. Once again I need your help.

I was given the following sentence and I have to divide it into finite and non finite clauses also indicating which is main clause and which is subordinate clause. More I have to say whelther the clauses after division are adverbial, complement or relative clause. I have done it, but please correct me if I am wrong.

"A single wall separated their lives but if he placed his ear to it he could hear her move about".

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Let me just start again. This is how I would look at it.

This is a compound-complex sentence:

"A single wall separated their lives but if he placed his ear to it he could hear her move about".

1-- A single wall separated their lives-- independent finite simple clause

2-- if he placed his ear to it he could hear her move about-- independent finite complex clause with an imbedded subordinate clause

Those are both 'main' clauses: those coordinate clauses are joined by the coordinate conjunction 'but'.

3-- he could hear her move about -- finite simple independent clause
4-- if he placed his ear to it -- finite subordinate clause-- I'll let CB tell you its function (I'd call it a conditional clause)

5-- he could hear her-- finite simple independent clause

6-- move about-- nonfinite clause that I would call an object complement; CB may have other ideas.
Not that my opinion counts for much, but I agree with CB. 'that' is a complementizer (a subset of subordinating conjunctions) that heads noun clauses.

And 'move about' is a verbal object of the catenative verb (subset--verb of the senses) 'hear'
Thanks again guys, for ur knowledge and patience.

So, the clause "if he placed his ear to it" is a finite subordinate clause, is it an adverbial clause? since the "if" can function as a condition. is there any subordinate adverbial clause, which in this case "if he placed his ear to it" would fit.

Another question, pleasce correct me if I am wrong.

Rewrite the 2 sentences as one, with the underlined passage as a finite wh-clause.

Sarah plays poker very well. It is surpising that Sarah plays poker well.

It is surprising how well Sarah plays poker.

Thank you so much!

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more