+0

A ‘golden duck’ refers to being out first ball.
Cricket Terms Explained | realbuzz.com

https://www.realbuzz.com/articles-interests/sports-activities/article/cricket-terms-explained/
The above example relates to cricket.
Shouldn't there be a preposition "on" before "first ball"?

+1
JigneshbharatiShouldn't there be a preposition "on" before "first ball"?

No. It appears "out first ball" is another cricket term.

You can find examples of "out first ball" online, but not examples of "out on first ball".

CJ

Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

Doesn't "getting out" and "first ball" needs to be related via a preposition?

Sorry , I am confused.

JigneshbharatiI am confused

Look online. 'out first ball' is a special expression.

https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22out+first+ball%22&l=0&t=0&ffo=false&findid=-1&ff=

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22out%20first%20ball%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

Silver duck is out second ball, and bronze duck (for some reason a phrase rarely used) is out third ball.

From Berkmann's Cricketing Miscellany

CJ

Is "out" a noun here? How do we confirm that?

Thanks!



Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
JigneshbharatiIs "out" a noun here?

I haven't got the slightest idea.

JigneshbharatiHow do we confirm that?

Find someone whose opinions you trust who knows both grammar and cricket.

Being American, I don't know anything about cricket except that it's played in the UK and it's remotely like baseball.

CJ

Jigneshbharati

A ‘golden duck’ refers to being out first ball.
Cricket Terms Explained | realbuzz.com

https://www.realbuzz.com/articles-interests/sports-activities/article/cricket-terms-explained /
The above example relates to cricket.
Shouldn't there be a preposition "on" before "first ball"?

Cricket or not, "first" has special abilities. You can say "I made it first try." and "I will come first thing." It does not always need any help from a preposition. I know this flies in the face of all that is holy in grammar, but so much the worse for grammar. There are a few odd wrinkles in English. Your example is an extreme one, and I must admit it sounds a bit odd to this American, but is has a deep idiomaticity which I find curiously satisfying.