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First come, first served.

Does the above come from "If you come first, you'll be served first?" If not, where does it derive from? Thanks.
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You've worked it out ok.
AngliholicFirst come, first served.

Does the above come from "If you come first, you'll be served first?" If not, where does it derive from? Thanks.
You're right.
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And remember that it is 'served' in spite of the fact that many people spell and say it without the d.
It it is wrongly written as 'First come, first serve', then I think it means since you come first, you have to serve the guest/s first.
Yoong LiatIt it is wrongly written as 'First come, first serve', then I think it means since you come first, you have to serve the guest/s first.
That might be what it would mean, but to my knowledge that expression with that meaning does not exist. It is simply a common error.
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Hi,

There is a parallel thread that talks about the same thing: Correct Usage of First-Come, First-Served
Hi Philip

I know there is no such saying. By the way, some people write 'first-come-first-served'. Can it be written this way?

Is 'first-come-first-served' basis ok or should it be 'first come, first served' basis?

Many thanks.
The only time I would use the hyphens would be in a playful, somewhat elaborate construction, for example:

You know how it is at the Smith house. Ten children, three or four of them screaming at any given moment, and mother and father dishing out dinner, approval, and smacks alike with a admirably democratic first-come-first-served policy.

But for a more formal notice:

As of May 1, employees will no longer be able to call ahead to the cafeteria to reserve catfish plates on Fridays. They will be available strictly on a "first come, first served" basis.
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