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Hi all..

please explain me what is difference between first and firstly when we are using it with a verb..

first learn ............

firstly learn .........
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Do you both realize this post was last added to well over two years ago?

Anyway, I agree that it's extremely rarely used in the U.S. I don't think I've ever used it in, and I've very rarely read it in U.S.-produced content.
Are "firstly", "secondly", "lastly" obsolete, and replaced now by first, second, last?
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They are not obsolete at all, but I wish they were: I find them redundant (I mean the -ly part), awkward and stilted. Nevertheless, they are still listed in many style guides as the proper formal equivalents of first, second and last.
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It is a British thing. Originally, it was "firstly"; then American English dropped -ly. In speech and writing people often mix American and British English. For example, although "toward" is American, I'm an American editor working in London who sees American writers use "towards" (British) all the time. There are a lot of British words Americans use. It doesn't mean it's not British.
The following website does an excellent job of explaining this problem. It's a matter of style.

http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=20010629
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An excellent reference! Thanks, Anon.
Agreed! I think you should be consistant however when using firstly to follow with secondly, thirdly...etc.
This string of posts has been very helpful to me. I am teaching in China and all my students use firstly. I used to tell them it was incorrect because as a native English speaker I had never heard it said until coming here. Now I figure it sounds more correct as in correlation with secondly, thirdly, etc. So I'm not crazy!
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I think you should be consistant however when using firstly to follow with secondly, thirdly...etc. — or even better, I think you should be consistent however when using first to follow with second, third...etc.
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