+0
The weather is good today according to the forecast. I plan to go on a fishing trip to the beach in X with my girlfriend and dog. It has been half a year since we have been on an outing.

Please correct any mistakes.
Thanks
1 2
Comments  
New2grammarThe weather is good today according to the forecast. I plan to go on a fishing trip to the beach in X with my girlfriend and dog. It has been half a year since we have been on an outing.

Please correct any mistakes.
Thanks

The first sentence feels a little "off". Maybe "The weather is going to be good today..." Perhaps a more idiomatic way to phrase the first would be: "The weather man says it's going to be nice today."
Thanks, RayH.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi New2, I don't see anything wrong. I'm a little puzzled by the logic of going to the beach for fishing. Perhaps you could explain what you have in mind.

You could be thinking of a beach at a lake or a beach at the ocean. Are you planning to stand on the beach and cast out into the water, or are you planning to wade into the water and cast out? Be careful not to hook one of the swimmers.

Sometimes "going to the beach" is substituted for "going to the shore." In this case we'd probably be speaking about the ocean. "Beach" is often part of the name of towns located on the seashore. I'm thinking of Moody Beach, Maine; Newport Beach, California; Miami Beach, Florida; etc. These towns would have a large beach for swimming, possibly a boardwalk for amusements, a pedestrian wharf from which people may cast a line, and a pier, or docks, where one can hire a boat to go deep sea fishing.
At each end of a beach, there's usually a cape and one can climb to the tip of the cap and cast out into the sea/ocean.
Where I live, the capes are usually small in size, extending probably 50 metres into the sea. And the best part is there are thousands of beaches here and most of them get less than 10 visitors a day. Please correct any misunderstanding of cape, beach, sea and ocean.
Most of what we call "capes" are big enough to accomodate a town or two or three - Cape Canaveral, Cape Cod. In New England, Cape Cod is simply referred to as "the cape." The ones you're referring to are usually called "points," or "a point of land," or "where the land juts out." The larger ones often have (proper) names. "Point Magu" is a town up the coast from LA which has a military installation.

Yes, what you describe is common and okay for fishing. Watch out for a rogue wave that can sweep you off the rocks.

Ray's right about the weather expression. It's a bit unusual. You need to cut the weather guys a little slack. It looks good/ should be good/ is supposed to be good according to the forcast. We often say, They're expecting/ predicting good weather.

BTW, I'm still thinking about the metal detector guys, hoping for a lucid moment.

- A.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks, Avangi. Could you give me an example of point in the context of fishing?

When we got to the beach, we quickly ran and climbed to the tip of the point and cast our lines out. (OK?)
When we got to the beach, we quickly ran to the end of the sandy stretch, and began working our way over the rocks, out to the end of the point, where we knew the fishing would be good.

A point is not necessarily sharper than a cape. It may have a tip or it may simply have an end.

"Climbed to the tip" seems to imply a high cliff. I'm not sure that's what you mean. (Perhaps it is.) If you say "climbing over the rocks," we picture a rocky section projecting out into the ocean, but not too far above the level of the water. I see both types. points where there's water between some of the huge rocks, and points made of solid land, possibly rising to a cliff.
I was talking about a land with rocks on its sides projecting into the sea and it doesn't have a high cliff and the sides ascend at a modest slope, probably 30 degrees. I guess climbing over the rocks is more suitable.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more