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Hi dear all;

What's differnece between: Five-minute & Five minutes. I mean their use in sentences.

Sincerely
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Comments  
When "five minutes" is used as an adjective, then "five minute" is very common

He took a five minute break. (adjective)
He took a break for five minutes( adverbial expression)
The book says:
Ten minutes by car // a ten-minute_________
Now what should be written in the blank and why?
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Am I all alone in thinking it is wrong to omit the hyphen in "a five-minute break"?
enoonAm I all alone in thinking it is wrong to omit the hyphen in "a five-minute break"?
Nope. I read it completely differently without. And in some cases the lack of a hyphen can reduce comprehension. But that's for another day...
Hi,

The book says:
Ten minutes by car // eg a ten-minute_drive____
Now what should be written in the blank and why?
'Ten-minute' is an adjective, as already noted, so it needs to be followed by a noun.

It also needs to be a noun because of the article 'a'.

Clive
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Is it correct to say "a ten-minute driving"?
Bbk_agpIs it correct to say "a ten-minute driving"?
No, but you can say "a ten-minute driving lesson"! (I don't think you would learn much in ten minutes, but you can say that. Emotion: smile )

CJ
We learnt that after "a ten-minute" a noun will come. How we can use verbs after this phrase? I thought by adding "ing" to verb we make it noun form of verb Emotion: thinking and now I think it's wrong idea.
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