Dear Users,

In this interview

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(at 1:24) Tony Iommi says: ...that fizzled out because of all different things...

If something fizzles out, it becomes a failure, doesn't it?

How common is this phrasal verb (is it a phrasal verb, actually?) in American English? Tony Iommi is British, so I assume it's a common expression in the UK, but is it slightly old-fashioned? Is it also used in other parts of the English-speaking world?


Thanks

Perfect StrangerIf something fizzles out, it becomes a failure, doesn't it?

Yes, eventually. It's not a sudden failure. Things go increasingly wrong as time goes on. Then comes the failure.

Perfect StrangerHow common is this phrasal verb (is it a phrasal verb, actually?) in American English?

Yes, it's a phrasal verb. It seems to have started in the US, where it was more popular than in Britain until about 1900. After that it became more popular in Britain, but today it is not much more commonly used than in the US. Usage in both varieties of English is about the same.

Perfect Strangeris it slightly old-fashioned?

No. It is at about the same level of frequency as it has been in both varieties of English for almost 100 years and has been used with increasing frequency since the 1990s.

Perfect StrangerIs it also used in other parts of the English-speaking world?

I have no information on that.

CJ

Perfect StrangerIs it also used in other parts of the English-speaking world?

Yes.