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i found such a sentence: fluency in one or more European language as well as English is essential. And i wonder if it's correct. Perhaps there should be language instead of languages, or maybe there's no diffenerce? Thanks in advance!
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QUOTE: Would it be incorrect to say "Fluency in one or more European languages as well as IN English is essential"?

This would be correct, although "IN" is "understood". In other words, "in" is not essential to convey the meaning but, strictly, it ought to be there. (In my opinion)
Comments  
Webster's Dictionary of English Usage has:
...the phrase one or more is plural in meaning and should take a plural verb; Bernstein 1958 asserts the same of one or two. What relevant evidence of these constructions we have in our files agrees with the commentators:

-One or two of the red brick and green copper pavilions ... still remain.

-... one or more of whose members have seen fit to order the removal....


(Your question is not the number of the verb, but that of one or more. It's plural. Use languages.)

However, Webster's says that one in (a larger number) and one out of (a larger number) should take the singular verb.
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I think it should be: Fluency in one or more European languages as well as English is essential.

Would it be incorrect to say "Fluency in one or more European languages as well as IN English is essential"?
 Eimai_Anglos's reply was promoted to an answer.