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Hi

Suppose you're a baseball pitcher, and you have a ball in your hand. As you wind up to throw the ball, a person who can integrate all the elements involved (position, speed, height, point of release, and so forth) can project a probability of where the ball will fly if all the calculations follow through and the ball is thrown.

--- Does "follow through" mean "finished"? When all the calculations are finished.
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In my limited knowledge of sports, I think that "follow-through" would include all the actions that follow the release of the ball. I'm told that follow-through is important in certain situations:

after the release of the bowling ball as it begins its journey down the lane; the upswing of a pianist's hands when finishing a phrase.

I'm not sure it's really important, but it certainly makes the action seem more graceful in most cases.
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It is not very clear to me. I most naturally understand "follow through" to mean that the calculations proceed to be realised as the ball flies along its trajectory. However, the sentence as a whole is worded as if the calculations "follow through" before the ball is thrown. I don't know in what sense of "follow through" that would work. I also don't understand why the word "if" was chosen rather than "when".
Mr Wordy However, the sentence as a whole is worded as if the calculations "follow through" before the ball is thrown.

Yes, it's before not after.

I take it to mean that if all calculations done by the given person will prove to be right (follow through) he/she will know how/where etc. the ball will fly before it is thrown.

There's a chapter in a book I'm reading where a psychic compares predictions vs probabilities. Predictions happen when the energy has been released (after the ball has been thrown) and probabilities before the energy is released (before the ball is thrown). That is why probabilities can be wrong cause the pitcher may decided not to throw the ball at all or throw it in a different direction. That's why probabilities can be faulty and predictions not! Emotion: wink
NewguestYes, it's before not after.
I take it to mean that if all calculations done by the given person will prove to be right (follow through) he/she will know how/where etc. the ball will fly before it is thrown.
Yes, I believe that this is the sort of meaning the author had in mind. I still don't understand how the calculations can prove to be right before the ball is thrown, however.
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