Hi,

Let us pretend that I have decided to inivite a group of my friends. And I have prepared a sumptuous meal that is consisted of many foods like spaghetti, meatball, pizza, fried chicken, etc. Can I say this in my email to my friends?

Hi, all, great news, I have prepared great foods for your culinary pleasure on Saturday morning. Please come and enjoy the foods I have prepared.

I have found this on the google book search and wonder whether the logic of the use of the word 'foods' is the same as mine or somewhat close to mine. Do you think if a situation, either implicitly and explicitly, indicate the kinds of food offered, then, it will be correct to use the word 'foods' instead of the word 'food'?
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In spite of the fact that your quesiton is very involved, I would say that both would be correct.
Hi,

Hi, all, great news, I have prepared great foods for your culinary pleasure on Saturday morning. Please come and enjoy the foods I have prepared.
Although this is correct, as already noted, my opinion is that people would most commonly say something like this.
Hi, all, great news, I have prepared a lot of different kinds of great food for your culinary pleasure on Saturday morning. Please come and enjoy what I have prepared.

Best wishes. Clive

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Dear Clive

Thank you for the commonly use sentence for me.

I have prepared a lot of different kinds of great food for your.....

But can I use "I have prepared a lot of different great food for your...>?

Thank you in advance
AnonymousAnd I have prepared a sumptuous meal
I believe the more appropriate word is 'scrumptious'.
Hi,
But can I use "I have prepared a lot of different great food for your...>? No, very unnatural.

Clive
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I have prepared a variety of great food for you.

"A sumptuous meal" is fine (lavish or grand). "Scrumptious" means delicious.
A Cornish PastyI have prepared a variety of great food for you.

"A sumptuous meal" is fine (lavish or grand). "Scrumptious" means delicious.

sumptuous means 'very expensive and looking very impressive'. We dined in sumptuous surroundings. / a sumptuous meal / a sumptuous palace

I don't think 'sumptuous' can be used with food cooked at home.
That would depend on how good a cook he is Emotion: smile
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