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Please read:

1. I think I am a very lucky person for I have had the privilege of learning what I love and doing jobs to which I feel committed, which paved the way for this current post.

2. I think I am a very lucky person for that I have had the privilege of learning what I love and doing jobs to which I feel committed, which paved the way for this current post.

3. I think I am a very lucky person for which I have had the privilege of learning what I love and doing jobs to which I feel committed, which paved the way for this current post.

Are all correct? Why? If (1) is correct, why? What is the rule?

Quoc
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CliveYou don't say 'because that' or 'because which'.
Quoc, I think Clive has answered your last question already. You cannot say 'because that' or 'because which'.
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Clive meant that in your sentences 'for' means 'because'.

It is incorrect to follow either option with 'that' or 'which'.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Hi,

#1 is fine. 'For' in this context means 'because'.

#2 and #3 are not correct. You don't say 'because that' or 'because which'.

Best wishes, Clive
4. I think I am a very lucky person because that I have had the privilege of learning what I love and doing jobs to which I feel committed, which paved the way for this current post.

5. I think I am a very lucky person because which I have had the privilege of learning what I love and doing jobs to which I feel committed, which paved the way for this current post.

Are (4) and (5) correct and do they have the same meaning with (1)?

Q
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