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I often see 'the divorce rate for love marriages is higher than that for arranged marriages',
but I sometimes see 'the divorce rate among love marriages'.
I guess 'the divorce rate of love marriages' is also gramatically correct.
Which is correct? All of the three are acceptable? Thank you in advance.
Comments  
AnonymousI often see 'the divorce rate for love marriages is higher than that for arranged marriages',
but I sometimes see 'the divorce rate among love marriages'.
I guess 'the divorce rate of love marriages' is also gramatically correct.
Which is correct? All of the three are acceptable? Thank you in advance.

I don't think that any of them could be considered gramatically incorrect, but I would certainly favor 'among' - no reason, just sounds better.
Could we also use "in", or "with"? Just to know whether they're on the grammatical side...
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PieanneCould we also use "in", or "with"? Just to know whether they're on the grammatical side...


I also think that 'the divorce rate [ in / with ] love marriages' is OK.
Are they gramatically correct?
Thank you.
I would say: ...the divorce rate among love marriages is higher than that of arranged marriages.

It sounds less repetitive than using among:among, or even of:of. I wouldn't use "for" in either place.

No, I wouldn't use in or with in this case.

That's my 2 cents!
I wouldn't myself use 'among'.

The 'divorce rate' pertains to the group {love marriages} as a whole.

MrP
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And the answer i-------s: ...for!
Thank you all for your responses.
I've learned a lot from this fruitful discussion.
Particularly it is interesting for me that 'among' is used to express something whole.
I will use 'the divorce rate for love marriages'.