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Hi!

I didn't tell him anything, for we haven't been getting along with each other lately.
You should've pulled over, for the cop told you to do that.

I'd like to know if the word "for" can be used with no problems as a conjunction, since I'm not sure if this usage is too formal, or old-fashioned. In short, is it suitable for nowadays' language?

Thanks in advance!

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andy155is it suitable for nowadays' language?
No. I never hear it in everyday conversation. In my opinion, it is far too old-fashioned.

CJ
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The word FOR is most often used as a preposition, of course, but it does serve, on rare occasions, as a coordinating conjunction. Some people regard the conjunction for as rather highfalutin and literary, and it does tend to add a bit of weightiness to the text. Beginning a sentence with the conjunction "for" is probably not a good idea, except when you're singing "For he's a jolly good fellow. "For" has serious sequential implications and in its use the order of thoughts is more important than it is, say, with because or since. Its function is to introduce the reason for the preceding clause:

• John thought he had a good chance to get the job, for his father was on the company's board of trustees.
• Most of the visitors were happy just sitting around in the shade, for it had been a long, dusty journey on the train.

SO... IT IS POSSIBLE!!!! IT'S KIND OF ODD, BUT IT IS GRAMATICALLY CORRECT, AND IT DOESN'T MATTER IF IT IS RATHER USED IN LITERATURE. YOU MAY USE IT WHENEVER YOU WANT, for IT IS CORRECT.

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm
Yes, you can use that as a conjunction. It may not be up-to-date sounding; however, it is correct!