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A friend recently sent me an email with a list of negative "facts" about a particular culture in the 20th Century. At the end, she said, "nor should any of this be a reason to bomb the heck out of the city".

She has published at least two novels, and I respect her linguistic integrity. She is from Australia originally and has spent many years in Britain and in the U.S. Is the use of "nor" without a "neither" common in places other than in the U.S.? Is it common in the U.S. without my knowing about it?

I'd love to hear from those who really have an answer to this, rather than just conjecture.
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PhilipAll that preceded this was the list of negative comments. The part in question should have a capital N, making it the supposed summary sentence.

"Nor should all........."

Right, I see. To me as a British English speaker, I wouldn't say this usage is common exactly, but I would read it without particularly remarking on its being notable or unusual.
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What precedes "nor"? Is the part you quote the tail end of a full sentence or does it stand alone?
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All that preceded this was the list of negative comments. The part in question should have a capital N, making it the supposed summary sentence.

"Nor should all........."

Sorry I didn't make it clearer.
 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks for your input, Mr. Wordy!
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It's used after "neither", or it can be also used after a negative clause to add another negative clause. From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:

nor:

(formal) used after a negative statement in order to introduce another negative statement containing a similar kind of information. Ex: I don't expect children to be rude, nor do I expect to be disobeyed.

By the way, according to Longman, you could also substitute "neither" for "nor" in such structures, but I don't think "neither" is common used that way. I don't remember coming across "neither" used that way, but I do remember seeing "nor" in such structures.

How else could you say that? I can only think of one alternative, with the adverb either: "I don't expect children to be rude, and I don't expect to be disobeyed either".
KooyeenIt's used after "neither", or it can be also used after a negative clause to add another negative clause.
The preceding sentences weren't negative in construction. They were just negative thoughts like "they slaughter animals mercilessly; they all drink too much; they let their children run wild in the streets". My concern was beginning a sentence with 'nor' when there hadn't been a 'neither'. I think Mr. Wordy answered that concern. Thanks, Kooyeen.
PhilipThe preceding sentences weren't negative in construction. They were just negative thoughts
Ah, that's different. In fact, I found it strange to think you were asking about "negative construction" + nor... because you definitely knew that was possible, since you are a native speaker. Emotion: big smile
But if they were just negative thoughts + nor, then no, I have never heard of that structure. And I don't think I'm interested in it either. I don't want to get in trouble. Emotion: stick out tongue
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