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Hi

Here's a line from "Criminal: United Kingdom".

"Not because we know you'll eventually feel much better for having finally gotten it off your chest."

I know what "get sth off one's chest" means but I can't understand the use of "having". And why is "gotten" used instead of "get"? Thanks in advance.

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Do you understand "feel better for getting it off your chest"? "getting" is the present participle (or in this case so-called "gerund"). Your sentence uses "having got(ten)", which is the perfect participle ("gotten" is AmE; "got" is BrE). The perfect participle implies that getting it off your chest is a completed action at the time of "feel better". However, in your sentence there is in practice little difference in meaning between "getting" and "having got(ten)". In other situations the difference may be more important.

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GPY

Do you understand "feel better for getting it off your chest"? "getting" is the present participle (or in this case so-called "gerund"). Your sentence uses "having got(ten)", which is the perfect participle ("gotten" is AmE; "got" is BrE). The perfect participle implies that getting it off your chest is a completed action at the time of "feel better". However, in your sentence there is in practice little difference in meaning between "getting" and "having got(ten)". In other situations the difference may be more important.

I see, thanks for the explanation but I think I need some clarification. Could you please tell me if these sentences are correct to say? And what is the exact difference?

1. I'm happy for getting a job.

2. I'm happy for having gotten a job.

3. I'll feel happy for having gotten a job.

3. I'll feel happy for getting a job.

Mina Uzun Could you please tell me if these sentences are correct to say? And what is the exact difference?
1. I'm happy for getting a job.
2. I'm happy for having gotten a job.
3. I'll feel happy for having gotten a job.
4. I'll feel happy for getting a job.

To me, the phrasing "happy for verb-ing" is not tremendously natural, but I believe that people do use it. It could be a regional or personal preference thing. Ignoring this, all the sentences are OK, and the pairs 1, 2 and 3, 4 mean about the same. Technically the difference, again, is that "having gotten a job" is a completed action at the time of "happy", while the timing of "getting a job" is more loosely indicated, but again this does not make an important difference because we understand the sequence of events anyway.

GPY
Mina Uzun Could you please tell me if these sentences are correct to say? And what is the exact difference?
1. I'm happy for getting a job.
2. I'm happy for having gotten a job.
3. I'll feel happy for having gotten a job.
4. I'll feel happy for getting a job.

To me, the phrasing "happy for verb-ing" is not tremendously natural, but I believe that people do use it. It could be a regional or personal preference thing. Ignoring this, all the sentences are OK, and the pairs 1, 2 and 3, 4 mean about the same. Technically the difference, again, is that "having gotten a job" is a completed action at the time of "happy", while the timing of "getting a job" is more loosely indicated, but again this does not make an important difference because we understand the sequence of events anyway.


Well, just one more thing. Sorry if it's a dumb question after your clear explanation but when I say "I'm happy for getting a job", does it not mean that the action have completed before the time of "happy"? By the way thank you so much for your patience.

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Mina UzunWell, just one more thing. Sorry if it's a dumb question after your clear explanation but when I say "I'm happy for getting a job", does it not mean that the action have completed before the time of "happy"?

This is what we understand from common sense. Because it is obvious that happiness arises after you get the job, we understand both in more or less the same way. Here is a case where there is more of a difference:

a) I feel happy living in London.
b) I feel happy having lived in London.

(a) means that you are happy at the same time as living in London, while (b) means that you are happy to have had that experience in the past.

GPY
Mina UzunWell, just one more thing. Sorry if it's a dumb question after your clear explanation but when I say "I'm happy for getting a job", does it not mean that the action have completed before the time of "happy"?

This is what we understand from common sense. Because it is obvious that getting a job causes happiness, we understand both in more or less the same way. Here is a case where there is more of a difference:

a) I feel happy living in London.
b) I feel happy having lived in London.

(a) means that you are happy at the same time as living in London, while (b) means that you are happy to have had that experience in the past.


I can't thank you enough. Much obliged for your help. Again, thank you so much for your patience:)