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Hi there,

what is the difference between:

* The old man has been in the hospital for 5 months
* The old man has been in the hospital since 5 months ago.

And the difference between:

* I haven't played tennis since 5 months ago
* I haven't been playing tennis since 5 months ago
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DaxiaoaixadHi there,

what is the difference between:

* The old man has been in the hospital for 5 months
* The old man has been in the hospital since 5 months ago.

And the difference between:

* I haven't played tennis since 5 months ago
* I haven't been playing tennis since 5 months ago
The first, "The old man has been in the hospital for 5 months" normally means that the old man is in hospital at the time of saying that sentence, but it can also mean that he once had the experience of being in hospital for 5 months.

The second sentence, "The old man has been in the hospital since 5 months ago.", though unusual in use, could mean that he was in hospital 5 months ago, was discharged, and then was later readmitted.
You'll see this has already been discussed: "Since a long time ago"

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PieanneYou'll see this has already been discussed: "Since a long time ago"



I think you'll find that it will also be discussed many times more. It's a common question in ESL circles.
Hi Dax,

When we use “since”, we typically should understand the current reference of time or at least it’s understood.

Ex: 1) John told his boss Mary when she walked in the office (at 8:30 am} “ I have been up since 5 o’clock working to finish the presentation at noon today”. Another way to remember is that, “since” refers back from the passed time to present.



2) “For” is used to focus on the duration of time in which something has already happened . If you want to make reference of something at the present to connect time already passed, then use” For”.



Ex: I’ve living at this address for 5 years

I have worked for the same boss for 3 years. (not since 3 years ago)
Daxiaoaixad,

The versions with "since" are understandable but completely unidiomatic.
You should use "for".

I haven't played tennis for five months.
I haven't been playing tennis for five months.


In this pair, the second is unusual. There is no need to be specific about the continuous aspect of a negative action, that is, the absence of an action.

CJ
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CalifJimDaxiaoaixad,

The versions with "since" are understandable but completely unidiomatic.
You should use "for".

I haven't played tennis for five months.
I haven't been playing tennis for five months.


In this pair, the second is unusual. There is no need to be specific about the continuous aspect of a negative action, that is, the absence of an action.

CJ

Hi CalifJim,

I see. Another question concerning "since".

* He has been working for the same company since ages.

Is it correct or we should say "for ages"?
CalifJim is not online for the moment, so allow me to butt in...

It's "for ages"; "ages" refers to a (very long) duration, try to replace it with "centuries", or "over ten years", you'll see it cannot be "since".
PieanneCalifJim is not online for the moment, so allow me to butt in...

It's "for ages"; "ages" refers to a (very long) duration, try to replace it with "centuries", or "over ten years", you'll see it cannot be "since".
thank you. I got the differences.

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