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For some time/sometime he lived in the south of Europe for the sake of his health.

Do both of some time and sometime fit in the above? If not, why not? Thanks.
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No.. 'Sometimes' (not sometime) means 'occassionally'.
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AngliholicFor some time/sometime he lived in the south of Europe for the sake of his health.

Do both of some time and sometime fit in the above? If not, why not? Thanks.
Hi,

It depends on what you want to convey. Here are defintions and associated examples for you to consider:

sometime (adv): at an indefinite or unstated time. EX: I'll see you sometime in the near future.
some time (adj some modifies noun time): a period of time. EX: I haven't seen him for some time.
sometimes (adv): at times, now and then. EX: Please call me sometimes.

Hope that helps,
Hoa Thai
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Hoa Thai
Angliholic
For some time/sometime he lived in the south of Europe for the sake of his health.

Do both of some time and sometime fit in the above? If not, why not? Thanks.
Hi,

It depends on what you want to convey. Here are defintions and associated examples for you to consider:

sometime (adv): at an indefinite or unstated time. EX: I'll see you sometime in the near future.
some time (adj some modifies noun time): a period of time. EX: I haven't seen him for some time.
sometimes (adv): at times, now and then. EX: Please call me sometimes.

Hope that helps,
Hoa Thai

Based on the above definitions, it should be For some time/sometime he lived in the south of Europe for the sake of his health. However, I think it would be better if the sentence were rephrased as He lived for some time in the south of Europe for the sake of his health.

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Thanks, my helpful friends.

Got it.