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This may be a hard question to answer, but could anybody please help me see why you can replace 'for that matter' in [2] with 'come to that,' and you cannot replace 'for that matter' in [1] with 'come to that'?

[1] My daughter is coming down with the flu. For that matter, most of her friends at the kindergarten are coming down with it too.

[2] Why shouldn’t John, or anybody in this class, for that matter, do this?

Is 'come to that' a British phrase?
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HSSIs 'come to that' a British phrase?
It may be. As an American, I understand it passively, but it's not part of my active vocabulary.

CJ
It seems to me (as an AmE speaker) that the phrases are synonymous and can be used in both sentences, but that 'come to that' sounds a bit dated or at least uncommon.
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What about 'Come to think of it'? Is it interchangeable?

British speakers seem to hold a different connotation for 'Come to that.' I await some comments from Britons too.

Thanks,

Hiro
HSSI await some comments from Britons too.
"Come to that", "For that matter" and "Come to think of it" are all familiar expressions in BrE. In sentences such as your #1, they all have roughly the same role -- that of prefacing a switch to a new (but often related) thought, topic or question that has occurred to the speaker or that the speaker wants to introduce.
[1] My daughter is coming down with the flu. For that matter, most of her friends at the kindergarten are coming down with it too.
[2] Why shouldn’t John, or anybody in this class, for that matter, do this?
Mr WordyIn sentences such as your #1, they all have roughly the same role
You mean #2? I was told elsewhere that #1 needed a more impressive, striking clause to qualify for the phrase 'come to that.'
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HSS
[1] My daughter is coming down with the flu. For that matter, most of her friends at the kindergarten are coming down with it too.

[2] Why shouldn’t John, or anybody in this class, for that matter, do this?
Mr WordyIn sentences such as your #1, they all have roughly the same role
You mean #2? I was told elsewhere that #1 needed a more impressive, striking clause to qualify for the phrase 'come to that.

No, I meant #1. For me, "Come to that" is possible in #1 (albeit the "come ... coming" repetition is awkward) -- but I do not disagree with the general thesis that it often introduces a "more impressive, striking clause". I intended such differences in emphasis to fall within the scope of my "roughly"!

The reason I mentioned #1 specifically is that after I wrote my explanation I realised that in #2 the expression does not introduce a new topic, as I had written. At the time, I didn't have time to think about it any more than just inserting "In sentences such as your #1"!

Sorry if my post was a bit rubbish.
Very informative, Mr. Wordy. 'Come to that' throws in an assertive color with an emphasizing comment, doesn't it? I tried to improve my example a bit:

[3] I hear a man working for the Metro Rail is coming down with H1N1. Come to that, 'I' may easily catch the bug in the near future, too. It's spreading fast.

Thanks,

Hiro
HSSVery informative, Mr. Wordy. 'Come to that' throws in an assertive color with an emphasizing comment, doesn't it? I tried to improve my example a bit:

[3] I hear a man working for the Metro Rail is coming down with H1N1. Come to that, 'I' may easily catch the bug in the near future, too. It's spreading fast.


Yes, this looks OK to me. "For that matter" would work here too, with slightly less "assertive colour and emphasis". "Come to think of it" is also possible, but again with less emphasis -- more like an afterthought.

(Picky quibble: "I" should be in italics, not quotes.)
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