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Hello. I was reading an article from TIME, and am having a sentence containing the phrase "for the ages." The phrase is used in the following sentence:

For Jews, who pined 2,000 years for Jerusalem, victory in the Six-Day War of 1967-and with it, control over the whole city-was a moment for the ages.

Does the sentence mean that the victory in the war was a moment Jewish people waited for ages, or does it mean that the moment has significance for Jewish people of all ages?

Please help, and thanks in advance.
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Hi,

I understand this phrase to mean that the victory will never be forgotten. It will be remembered in all the ages (ie the eras) yet to come.

Clive
Comments  
I think you have reason! It's the most suitable